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VideoLost Dog 07-31-2015 Shannon Ridge Subdivision Rat Terrier female white w brown spots answers to bebe. Please contact Yolanda Mandigo 830-477-7821

VideoFound: older Dachshund running down the road. If this is your dog please call (210)789-0925. Will need proof and verification that the dog is your's.
Lost/dognapped: Black Lab/Pyrenees male puppy, about 30 pounds, vaccination tag on collar, last seen on Wood Valley Dr., Wood Valley Acres, Adkins, Sat., July 18 around noon. 210-827-9533.
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DRIVER needed, 51 year old business needed a delivery driver, guaranteed 40 hours per week, day trips only, overtime rate is time and a half, paid health insurance. Contact Jason at Pogue Agri Partners, Inc., Kenedy, Texas. Call 830-583-3456 or email Jason@pogueagri.com.
Service Technician Assistant. Job description: Assist technician in propane tank installation, gas piping, shop work and repairs. Paid training, paid uniform, family insurance (medical and dental), paid holidays and vacation. Will need to pass a physical, background check, and drug/alcohol test. Must be willing to obtain a CDL license in the future for backup driver position. Call Kathleen, 830-393-2533, Smith Gas Company.
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On The Road To Forever


Allow Jesus to help you take out trash




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Disclaimer:
Thomas Bonham is responsible for this content, which is not edited by the Wilson County News or wilsoncountynews.com.
December 14, 2010 | 1,104 views | Post a comment

I grew up in a small town in Yankee-land where we had all the services of treated water, sewage, and garbage pickup. But I can also remember visiting friends and grandparents who lived in the country where things were very different.

Well water varied from place to place. Some tasted good; some, bad; some kind of red, some kind of black, and some just plain stank so badly you just didn’t want to use it at all. Sewage, of course, was a septic system, not always in the best of condition. Then there was the household trash pit.

As a young boy, taking the trash to the pit was an adventure. Everything under the sun had been thrown in a pile for years, allowing Mother Nature to tend to the recycling process at her own speed and time.

The pit was filled with tin cans by the hundreds, bottles of every shape and size, furniture and bed springs, old appliances, an ash pit for the coal-burning house furnace, worn-out bicycles, tires, a rusted-out car or two, and sometimes a wrecked vehicle which came with a story on how it got in that shape.

We purchase, use, then throw it away without giving it a second thought. We are consumers and that’s what we do best. Consume things. It’s still a chore that has to be done regularly, putting out the trash. It all gets hauled off to a trash pit somewhere out of sight and out of mind. Mother Nature still does her thing.

The Sunday school teacher asked Jimmie why he was late.

“I was gonna go fishing, but Daddy wouldn’t let me,” Jimmie replied.

“You have a wise father,” said the teacher. “Did he explain why you shouldn’t go fishing today?”

“Sure,” said Jimmie. “My dad said there wasn’t enough bait for both of us to go fishing.”

A man took his 3-year-old daughter to the home-improvement store. She quickly became tired of walking, so he let her ride on his shoulders. Soon after he began carrying her, she started pulling on his hair. Although he asked her kindly several times to cease pulling his hair, she kept on.

Getting annoyed, he began to severely scold her. “But Daddy,” she whimpered, “I’m trying to get my bubble gum back!”

[Ephesians 4: 17-32; Colossians 3: 1-9; James 1: 19-21; 1 Peter 2: 1]

A consumer is generally considered to be the “end user.” Of course this involves a lot more than eating a bologna sandwich and drinking a soda. Our stomach is probably the least to receive what we consume. Our eyes and ears consume the most of what we use in this life, and unfortunately, that can tend to make our brain a sizable trash pit. It’s the end of the year and most everyone is examining their life, making a note on the things they would like to change, making resolutions (promises) to oneself. May I suggest it’s time to take out the trash?

Paul, James, and Peter have made some great statements on what you must do to clean up your trash pit. Jesus teaches about taking out the trash (Luke 11: 24-26). The trouble is, if you don’t put something back in its place, you may end up with a bigger trash pit than before. So, the wisdom of the Spirit has also led the Apostles to tell us what we must replace our trash with [Ephesians 5: 1-21; Colossians 3:10-17; James 1: 22-25; 2 Peter 1: 3-8].

Can you clean up your trash pit? Yes, you can, with God’s help.

Trust in the Lord to make all things right and it will happen. Don’t like some of the things in your life? Pray about them and work on change. God loves you so much He gave us His one and only Son, sacrificed for the atonement of the sins of the world.

God is willing to work on your trash pit with you today. Pray about it.

Thomas W. Bonham is an associate minister with the Floresville Church of Christ. His e-mail is twbonham@felpsis.net. Find his column on his blog at http://wilsoncountynews.com.
 
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