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VideoStill missing long hair chihuahua. Near 3rd and 97 please if you see her she is very missed. Call jeri 409-781-3191
Lost: Small black and white tortoise shell cat, 1-1/2 years old, since Aug. 8, Country Hills area, La Vernia, very friendly, "Cinnamon" but responds more to "Kitty," rhinestone collar with bell, shots and spayed, family loves and misses her terribly. Reward! 210-725-8082.

Videofound in eagle creek with a collar no tags. very friendly non aggressive. call if he is yours 210-844-1951. clean and healthy
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WATER SUPERVISOR. The City of Elmendorf has an opening for a full-time WORKING water supervisor with a Texas Class “C” water license. Previous management experience required.  Field work required. Must be familiar with state water laws and reporting. Tractor and/or backhoe experience desirable and two years related experience preferred. $43,680.00 annual salary plus benefits after probationary period. Apply online at tml.org or contact Roxanne DeLeon at 210-635-8210 for more information. This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.  
Plastic Product Formers, Inc. is accepting applications for a full-time blow-mold operator. Must be willing to perform physical work in an outside environment and work 10-12 hour shifts including overtime. Must be willing to work some weekend and night shifts. Will be required to clean, set-up, operate, and monitor blow-mold equipment while also performing trimming and inspection of production parts. Includes packaging and material handling. Must pass background check and drug test. Excellent benefits offered. Fax 210-635-7999 or apply in person at 7124 Richter Road, Elmendorf, TX.
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National News


FCC Regulatory Overreach Threatens the Internet




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The author of this entry is responsible for this content, which is not edited by the Wilson County News or wilsoncountynews.com.
U.S. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison
December 23, 2010 | 2,254 views | Post a comment

The Internet has grown and flourished for more than 20 years without burdensome federal regulations. Absent government roadblocks that could hold up progress, the Internet has been able to evolve and rapidly advance as technology develops. Along with it, business development and job creation, spurred by web-based innovation, have been strengthened by a free market-oriented environment. Unfortunately, this could soon change because of new Internet regulations issued by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in a three-to-two party line vote on December 21, 2010.

The new rules represent an unprecedented power-grab by the unelected members of the FCC, to whom Congress has delegated very limited authority to act in the area of broadband services. This unaccountable group of regulators is creating authority to intervene in an area that represents one-sixth of the nation's economy. The move installs a government arbiter to force their idea of how the Internet should be run on users and the companies that are trying to make broadband access available to Americans throughout the nation.

The public is largely happy with the way the Internet currently works -- as a private resource. The FCC action is a solution in search of a problem.

The FCC’s proposed regulations are particularly concerning because they would impose new directives onto communications companies that will stifle the Internet’s well-known and successful spirit of innovation. Heavy-handed regulations threaten investment in broadband Internet services, which could place valuable American jobs at risk. And any downturn in investment will limit the next evolution of this technology. Businesses would be less likely to build out advanced next generation wireless broadband networks or to bring high-speed Internet services to rural communities because they cannot be certain their investments would be successful.

Investment could further languish because businesses will constantly fear violating vague and fluctuating Internet regulations. One of those murky rules under the FCC’s new regulations states that providers may not “unreasonably discriminate” against lawful internet traffic. On its face, that sounds like a laudable goal -- but, as with most government regulations, the devil is in the details. The term is ambiguously defined in the order, and how the FCC interprets and enforces what is “reasonable” will determine how limiting this restriction is.

The “unreasonable discrimination” order would in effect establish that the FCC would have an approval portal that companies must pass through just to manage their day-to-day operations. For instance, if a provider notices that a small number of users are sharing huge file dumps that are leading to congestion on the network, it should have the right to slow down those connections in order to relieve the congestion for the vast majority of users. But under the FCC’s new regulations, unelected government regulators could determine that such an action is “unreasonable.” By diminishing companies’ flexibility in managing their own networks, the regulation could also undermine Internet providers’ ability to guarantee subscribers high quality service.

The FCC’s primary argument for these new rules is to ensure that Internet customers are not blocked by service providers from viewing or sending lawful content of their choice. Again, on the surface, this seems perfectly reasonable. However, this is already the reality of today’s open Internet environment. Broadband providers currently support consumers accessing the content of their choice and using devices and applications they desire. This is because the free market system has worked. Burdensome government meddling is not needed.

The FCC has not provided any evidence to justify this regulatory overreach. In fact, the Internet has developed and thrived precisely because it has not been weighed down with oppressive government regulations. We must preserve the openness of the Internet as a platform for innovation and economic growth without a preemptive regulatory intervention by the government. Government regulation of the Internet is in not in anyone’s interest. Fighting this overreach will be one of my top priorities in the coming year. I will work to halt these regulatory burdens and explore other efforts to reform the FCC in the 112th Congress.
 
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