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VideoMissing: Male Boxer, since evening of Jan. 4, Hwy. 97 West, rear of Promised Land Creamery, $500 REWARD. Call 830-391-2240 with information.
Bear, please come home! Missing since October 22, 2014, black Manx cat (no tail), shy. Reward! Help him find his way home. 210-635-7560.
Lost: Female German Shepherd, about 2 years old, pink collar, lost from Hickory Hill/Great Oaks Subdivisions off FM 539, La Vernia, on Thurs., Feb. 4. Reward! 830-947-3465.
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Giggles and Smiles Learning Center now hiring teachers, must have high school diploma or GED, on job training, morning and afternoon shifts available. Inquire at 2000 10th St., Floresville, 830-393-3814.
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Agriculture Today


Reason for pecans cost increase




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January 12, 2011 | 3,150 views | Post a comment

Q.I have heard that 2010 was a good pecan year. If that is so, what would explain my trees’ poor performance and the high price of pecans?

A. The pecan crop bounty was localized. If you had irrigation for the summer and fall after the rains quit, the crop was good. Based on reports in national publications, the high price of pecans is mostly due to high demand, particularly from the Chinese!

Q.When is the earliest we can expect our grass to green up? Is there anything we can do to speed up the process? We do not like the look of a dormant lawn.

A. Lawns in Central and South Texas begin to green up in late March. Fall fertilization (November) contributes to early green-up, but the main factors are temperature and moisture. A period of warm weather stimulates new growth if there is moisture available. Early spring fertilization only seems to contribute to weed growth. Brown is a color of nature, learn to appreciate it. Besides, you do not need to mow a brown lawn!

Calvin Finch is a horticulturist and the San Antonio Water System’s project director of regional initiatives and special projects. E-mail him at reader@wcn-online.com .
 

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