Wednesday, October 22, 2014
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

Lost & Found

Found: Calico cat, female, white, orange, and black, on CR 352, La Vernia. 210-667-1052.
Lost: Black female Chihuahua named Gloomy and black male Chihuahua named Rico, from CR 126, Floresville, missed dearly by their family! Call 210-428-3803. 
If you are missing a pet in Floresville, be sure to check the Floresville holding facility. Animals are only kept for 3 days. Contact Las Lomas K-9 Rescue, 830-581-8041.
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Help Wanted

Mission Road Ministries is a nonprofit organization serving more than 825 children and adults with intellectual & other developmental disabilities each day with residential, day services and vocational programs in San Antonio, Texas helping clients reach independence, productivity and inclusion in the community. Seeking Residential Care Professionals for our Children and Adult Programs; FT, PT.  $8-$10.25/hr. depending on experience and education.  Must be at least 21 years of age; pass background check and drug testing.  Interviews every week. Call for an appointment, 210-924-9265.
Custodian, night shift 1 p.m.-9 p.m. Anyone requesting an application or job description may contact: 830-996-3551. An application may also be downloaded from our website at www.stockdale.k12.tx.us. All openings are available until filled. Stockdale ISD is an equal opportunity employer. Stockdale ISD does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, handicap, or age in its employment practices.
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Keeping the Faith


Set a pace and run the race




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Disclaimer:
Ronnie McBrayer is responsible for this content, which is not edited by the Wilson County News or wilsoncountynews.com.

January 14, 2011 | 1555 views | Post a comment

My middle school-aged sons have reached a new challenge in their sports career. This year they began serious athletic conditioning in their physical education class -- times being what they are, I’m glad P.E. is still required. Gone are the romping-around-days of freeze-tag and unruly dodge ball games. Now they have to meet physical strength standards and run the mile every week.

And not only do they have to run it, their coach requires that each student improve their running time every week. Now, I’m no help to them in this department at all. Call on me for help with a history project or a book report. But running? Forget it. In fact, if you ever see me running -- running anywhere -- please stop and help me. Something big and bad is chasing me.

No, it is their mother who must coach them when it comes to improving their weekly time. What with her little collection of 5K trophies and ribbons --continually they mock me. She’s best qualified for showing them the way. And the thing she teaches them most often is how to set pace, how to finish the race they begin.

To complete any long-distance race, the runner must set a speed that he or she can maintain. Flying out of the starting block as if your britches are on fire will do you no good if you are sucking wind by the second turn; this is true on the track, and true in life.

The writer of the book of Hebrews, aptly enough, once compared life to a sporting event. We are athletes on the track in this arena of life and there is a race to run. His coaching advice to us is essential. He says, “Strip down, travel light, and don’t quit.”


You can’t run in stiletto heels or heavy steel-toed boots. You can’t maintain your pace while running in a three-piece suit or denim skirt. Get rid of those things that will only entangle and slow you. And forget about carrying anything with you: No backpacks, no pull-behind wagons, no coolers, or picnic baskets. Free yourself from as much baggage as possible, just as a runner in a race.

And then, keep your eyes on the finish line, not being distracted by those things that can divert you off the track; finish the course. Don’t go wandering into the stands for a hot dog or a beer. Get out of the souvenir shop and the weight room. Quit giving interviews to ESPN while the game is still on. Those who finish the race are the ones who stay at it, so stay at it.

On my to-do list before I turned the big “4 -- 0” last year was to complete a century bicycle ride -- a 100 miles in a day. I’m not a complete couch potato!

So I took the writer of Hebrews’ advice. I got in shape and as light as possible. And on the day of the ride, I didn’t concern myself with what was going on anywhere else in the world. I didn’t stop to visit with people or take leisurely breaks at Starbucks. I stayed with it, grinding away hour after hour and mile after mile.

My friends asked me millions of questions afterward: “How many people rode in the ride?” I can’t remember now. “What place did you finish?” I don’t know. “How long did it take you from beginning to end?” Forever, it seems. “How many hours did you put in training?” Not enough. “Would you do it again?” Yes, I will.

But for me, there was only one question I wanted to be able to answer when it was over: “Did you finish?” Yes, I did, and for me that was enough.

The Scriptures do not provide us with any mystical, steroidized shortcuts to “run (or ride) with perseverance the race marked out for us.” Instead, they coach us to set a pace for the marathon of life we must run. It will take everything we have to finish, but finishing is enough.

Ronnie McBrayer is the author of “Leaving Religion, Following Jesus.” He writes and speaks about life, faith, and Christ-centered spirituality. Visit his website at www.ronniemcbrayer.net.
 
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