Tuesday, December 1, 2015
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

WCN Site Search

Lost & Found

Lost: Male dog, looks like Pit Bull, white w/brown freckles, green eyes, "Shelby," last seen morning of Nov. 18, 1604 between New Sulphur Springs and Jim Terrill Rd. 210-389-9047.
*Includes FREE photo online! mywcn.com/lostandfound

VideoLOST BLACK BULL WITH WHITE &BLACK Face. Off FM2579 & CR126 NOV.28 comes to Whooo Call 818-416-3372 Ask for Edward
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

Maverick Grill is hiring cashier, kitchen help, cook, and line cook. Apply in person Mon.-Fri. between 2-5 p.m., 6671 U.S. Hwy. 181 North, Floresville. 830-216-2712.
Although we make every effort to spot suspicious ads before they run, one may occasionally get into print. If that happens, we ask the consumer to call us ASAP so that we can take corrective action.
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos

Video Vault ›
You’ve been granted free access to this subscribers only article.

Agriculture Today

’Tis the season to control feral hogs

E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story
February 8, 2011 | 3,214 views | Post a comment

Wet, mild weather improved winter pastures during the last week of January, according to Texas AgriLife Extension Service personnel.

The winter storm that struck Feb. 1 brought more moisture, which should benefit crops, but the extreme cold was expected to further stress livestock.

But if there’s a silver lining to weather this time of year, it’s that conditions are optimal for feral hog control, said Billy Higginbotham, AgriLife Extension wildlife specialist.

“February is a month when we really need to concentrate control of feral hogs for a number of reasons,” Higginbotham said.

This is because during the last 30 to 45 days of winter, native food supplies are becoming scarce and hogs are on the move in search of something to eat, he said.

“This makes them more vulnerable to some of our control techniques, such as trapping, shooting, and snaring, because they are moving and in search of food,” he said.

No one really knows how many feral hogs there are in Texas, Higginbotham said.

“But we do know that regardless of the population out there, the economic damage can be drastically reduced by adopting best management practices,” he said.

For ground-based and aerial hunters, the advantages of feral hogs being on the move are obvious, he said.

In areas like East Texas, where there is more cover, the name of the game is trapping, ground-shooting, and snaring, Higginbotham said. For trappers, it’s important to fit the size of the trap to the size of the herd, which is called a “sounder.”

He recommended that landowners “get the hogs on bait.” This expression means getting them used to visiting a location for food, usually shelled corn. Then, using automatic cameras or other means, the landowner needs to estimate the size of the hog herd and construct a trap size accordingly.

It’s not too late this year to get started on getting the hogs on bait, he said, but even it were, it’s a good idea to do it anytime a landowner sees signs of feral hog damage.

More information on controlling feral hogs can be found at http://feralhogs.tamu.edu/ .

Your Opinions and Comments

Be the first to comment on this story!

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Not a subscriber?
Subscriber, but no password?
Forgot password?

Agriculture Today Archives

Coupons ag-right
Heavenly Touch homeTriple R DC ExpertsVoncille Bielefeld homeClarity Wellauto chooserDrama KidsAllstate & McBride Realty

  Copyright © 2007-2015 Wilson County News. All rights reserved. Web development by Drewa Designs.