Monday, March 30, 2015
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

WCN Site Search


Lost & Found


VideoFound: Black female dog with white spot on chest, in Poth, very friendly but has no collar. Call 830-484-2024
Large amount of cash in blue bank envelope lost in or around Floresville Tax Office (across from library) Please call if found. I can identify details. Jan 830 391 3757 God Bless
FOUND SHEEP,black. on CR 427 & Hwy 123 Pls call to claim 210-862-1220
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

Mission Road Ministries is a nonprofit organization serving more than 825 children and adults with intellectual & other developmental disabilities each day with residential, day services and vocational programs in San Antonio, Texas helping clients reach independence, productivity and inclusion in the community. Seeking Residential Care Professionals for our Children and Adult Programs; FT, PT.  $8-$10.25/hr. depending on experience and education.  Must be at least 21 years of age; pass background check and drug testing.  Interviews every week. Call for an appointment, 210-924-9265.
HEAD REGISTERED NURSE. Camino Real Community Services (CRCS) is looking for a Texas licensed Registered Nurse with clinical psychiatric nursing and management experience to serve as our Lead RN for a Crisis Residential Facility. Position is in Lytle, Texas with hours that are generally between 8 a.m.–7 p.m., Monday through Friday, but includes some weekend coverage-schedule requires flexibility. Must participate in on-call rotation to ensure the facility remains operational. This position is 75% direct care. Submit resume to Camino Real CS, Attn: HRS, P.O. Box 725, Lytle, TX 78052. Fax 830-772-4304. Visit www.caminorealcs.org for details. EOE.
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos





Video Vault ›

Commentaries


Senate, House committees tangle with state budget




E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story

Disclaimer:
The author of this entry is responsible for this content, which is not edited by the Wilson County News or wilsoncountynews.com.
Ed Sterling
Capital Highlights
February 21, 2011 | 1,978 views | Post a comment

AUSTIN -- Last week, the Senate Finance and the House Appropriations committees were busy gathering input in daily hearings to fine tune their respective versions (Senate Bill 1 and House Bill 1) of the state budget for 2012-2013.

The committees have to figure out how to make ends meet on much less revenue, so it’s all about what to cut. They are looking at a spending ceiling of perhaps $160 billion for the two-year period, in the face of budget requests from all agencies totaling more than $200 billion.

It’s a monumental task to sort through compelling needs brought before them as they struggle toward decisions that will result in cuts to education, health and human services, prisons, transportation, law enforcement and more.
Meanwhile, the decennial United States Census figures for Texas arrived on Feb. 16. The information not only provides the basis for the Congressional seat allocation and redistricting, it generally determines how much federal funding Texas rates. And that will play into state budget calculations Texans will see in the House and Senate bills.

Sonogram bill gets approval

The Texas Senate on Feb. 17 passed legislation that would require a medical doctor who is about to terminate a pregnancy to make a digital image of the fetus and offer to show the sonogram image to the patient before the procedure continues.

Senate Bill 16, authored by Dan Patrick, R-Houston, tentatively approved on a vote of 21-10, now moves to the House for consideration.

The doctor also would be required to record the heartbeat of the fetus and offer the patient the opportunity to hear it; plus, the doctor would be required to give a verbal explanation of the images. That explanation would be optional if the pregnancy is a result of sexual assault or incest; or the fetus has an irreversible medical condition or abnormality, as previously identified by reliable diagnostic procedures and documented in the patient’s medical file.

And, among further requirements in the bill, there is a clause that authorizes a doctor to perform an abortion without obtaining informed consent in a medical emergency.

Gov. Rick Perry praised the Senate in regards to SB 16 and said, “I look forward to working with House members to pass this legislation quickly, to ensure Texans are fully informed when considering such an important decision.”

AG testifies against EPA actions

Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott was in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 9 to testify before a subcommittee of the U.S. House Energy and Commerce Committee.
Abbott, while discussing the state of Texas’ legal challenge to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s recent takeover of the greenhouse gas regulatory role, said “Texas cannot support the EPA -- and in fact must challenge it -- when it pursues regulations that are contrary to the (Clean Air Act) and devastating to the economy.”

Free tax filing available to some

The Texas Workforce Commission on Feb. 11 announced the availability of Free File, a free, federal income tax preparation and electronic filing program for eligible taxpayers.

Taxpayers with a 2010 Adjusted Gross Income of $58,000 or less who meet additional requirements can qualify to use it. Visit IRS.gov <http://irs.gov/> for more information.

The Workforce Commission also encouraged qualified taxpayers to take advantage of the Earned Income Tax Credit allowing lower-income earners and families to pay less or no federal income tax, or receive cash payments.

Tuition program near deadline

Feb. 28 is the deadline to enroll in the Texas Tuition Promise Fund, the state’s prepaid college tuition program.

Texas Comptroller Susan Combs last week reminded families to take advantage of the program, which offers a hedge against future increases in tuition and required fees at Texas public colleges and universities.

Participants lock in the cost of undergraduate tuition and required fees at today’s prices and choose from a variety of options to prepay for those costs.

Longest-serving jurist laid to rest

Former Texas Supreme Court Chief Justice Joe Greenhill, 96, died Feb. 11. He joined the court in 1957 and served as chief justice from 1972 to 1982.
The Houston native’s 25-year tenure on the high court is the longest of any Supreme Court justice in the history of Texas. Burial was in the Texas State Cemetery on Feb. 15.
 
‹ Previous Blog Entry
 

Your Opinions and Comments


Be the first to comment on this story!


You must be logged in to post a comment.




Not a subscriber?
Subscriber, but no password?
Forgot password?

Commentaries Archives


Commentaries
Commentaries page govtrack.us
Commentaries who represents me?
Sacred Heart SchoolChester WilsonAllstate & McBride RealtyHeavenly Touch homeTriple R DC ExpertsVoncille Bielefeld home

  Copyright © 2007-2015 Wilson County News. All rights reserved. Web development by Drewa Designs.