Friday, January 30, 2015
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

WCN Site Search


Lost & Found

If you are missing a pet in Floresville, be sure to check the Floresville holding facility. Animals are only kept for 3 days. Contact Las Lomas K-9 Rescue, 830-581-8041.
Found: Pretty white medium female dog, Jan. 11, in Homeplace Subdivision, Adkins, has black spot over eye, very friendly and sweet, misses owner, must find home, cannot keep. 210-649-1886.
Our beloved Gracie is missing since October, Dachshund/Lab mix, microchipped, about 30 pounds, black with little white. $1000 reward for safe return. Call with any information, 830-393-9999 or 419-250-9099.
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

ON-CALL CRISIS POOL WORKERS NEEDED. Part-time positions are available for after hours “on-call” crisis workers to respond to mental health crisis for Wilson and Karnes Counties. Duties include crisis interventions, assessments, referrals to stabilization services, and referrals for involuntary treatment services according to the Texas Mental Health Laws. You must have at least a Bachelor’s Degree in psychology, sociology, social work, nursing, etc. On-call hours are from 5 p.m.-8 a.m. weekdays, weekends and holidays vary. If selected, you must attend required training and must be able to report to designated safe sites within 1 hour of request for assessment. Compensation is at a rate of $200 per week plus $100 per completed and submitted crisis assessment, and mileage. If interested call Camino Real Community Services, 210-357-0359.
CDL Driver needed for local delivery in Kenedy location, must have Class B CDL with hazmat endorsement, hours are Mon.-Fri., 8-5:30 and occasional Saturdays until noon. Company offers sick pay, vacation, and benefits package. Apply in person at 3-D Welding Supply at either Kenedy or Floresville location.
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos





Video Vault ›

Commentaries


The Economist: Disaster in Japan




E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story

Disclaimer:
The author of this entry is responsible for this content, which is not edited by the Wilson County News or wilsoncountynews.com.
M. Ray Perryman
March 16, 2011 | 1,616 views | 1 comment

Horrific images of the earthquake of historic proportions and associated tsunami which devastated Japan continue to fill media outlets. The loss of life and tragic scenes are difficult to comprehend, and returning to normalcy seems an almost insurmountable task. As we go to press, the nuclear plant continues to present a potential crisis. While the human toll is beyond measure, the economic cost of the disaster is already being assessed.

Many of Japan’s largest factories remain shuttered. Power problems are widespread, and transportation is exceedingly difficult. Business losses mount each day and will continue to do so until production resumes. A huge outlay of funds will be required to rebuild commercial buildings, houses, and infrastructure.

The incident is also affecting economies around the globe, including those of the US and Texas. Japan is an important trading partner, and the events there are shaping indicators ranging from the US stock market to the nuclear power industry.

Trade is an important sector of the Japanese economy. The nation is ranked 5th in the world for total dollar amount of imports and exports according to the CIA World Fact Book. The US is Japan’s second largest import and export partner, after China. For the US, Japan is the fourth biggest export destination.

As the US leader in exports, Texas is a hub for world trade, exporting over $206 billion worth of goods in 2010. While Mexico is Texas’ largest trading partner by far, Texas exporters also have growing ties with East Asia. In fact, Japan ranked 10th as a partner for exports from Texas, which represented a dollar amount of almost $4.0 billion last year.

Texas merchandise exported to Japan in 2010 included chemicals (41.8% of all exports to Japan), computer and electronic products (17.6%), machinery, except electrical (10.6%), and transportation equipment (5.7%).

Texas also receives billions worth of imports from Japan. In 2010, 30.1% of imports from Japan were computer and electronic products. This was followed by machinery, except electrical (20.6%), transportation equipment (10.9%), and primary metal manufacturing (10.7%).

Japan has also been known to invest heavily in Texas. From 2005-2010, Japan represented 9% of all foreign direct investment (FDI) projects in Texas and was the fourth source country for FDI projects in Texas. These tens of billions of dollars in investment inflows continue to support jobs and other economic activity in the Lone Star State.

Stifling this activity will affect companies across the state and nation. Exporters will temporarily lose an important market for their products. Importers may face shortages of needed parts for manufacturing as well as end-use electronics, cars, trucks, and other items.

Another aspect of the fallout from the Japanese situation is a potential slowdown in the US nuclear industry. It has been decades since a new nuclear generation facility has come online in the US. Recently, however, proponents had gained some traction in adding new nuclear generation capacity, with projects well down the road in the southeastern US and in Texas. Support for these initiatives included federal loan guarantee programs instituted by former President Bush and slated for expansion by President Obama.

In Texas, nuclear generation represents an important source of diversification in the mix of input fuels used in power plants, thus contributing to price stability and predictability. In addition, nuclear fuels are completely clean burning, helping to ameliorate greenhouse gas issues.

The frightening prospect of a meltdown and release of radiation in Japan has sparked calls for stopping new construction. In fact, a major project in Texas has already been suspended for now. However, it is important to note that the plant in Japan is decades old, and newer facilities would be built with significantly advanced safety features.

With global economies only recently gaining momentum after the financial crisis, the timing of this setback may increase its effects. The Bank of Japan is pumping in funds at a rapid rate, but has little room to drop interest rates and is dealing with relatively high debt loads thanks to past efforts to stimulate the economy.

The magnitude of the economic damage will not be known for some time. The costs in terms of human suffering and loss of life are already immeasurable.
Dr. M. Ray Perryman is President and Chief Executive Officer of The Perryman Group ( http://www.perrymangroup.com). He also serves as Institute Distinguished Professor of Economic Theory and Method at the International Institute for Advanced Studies.
 
« Previous Blog Entry (March 11, 2011)
 


Your Opinions and Comments

 
Elaine K.  
Floresville  
March 16, 2011 7:23pm
 
 
A new column has been posted.
 

Share your comment or opinion on this story!


You must be logged in to post comments:



Other Commentaries

Commentaries
Commentaries page govtrack.us
Commentaries who represents me?
Heavenly Touch homeEast Central Driving SchoolBlue Moon Karaoke & DJAllstate & McBride RealtyWilson's Auto ChooserVoncille Bielefeld homeChester WilsonSacred Heart SchoolDrama KidsTriple R DC Experts

  Copyright © 2007-2015 Wilson County News. All rights reserved. Web development by Drewa Designs.