Sunday, May 1, 2016
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

WCN Site Search


Preview the Paper Preview the Paper

Preview this week's Paper
A limited number of pages are displayed in this preview.
Preview this Week’s Issue ›
Subscribe Today ›

Lost & Found


VideoMarma went missing near FM427/CR537. F/Terrier mix/30lbs/Orange/Red medium length fur. Can be extremely shy- please call or text 210-440-3889 if seen.
Found: Female dog with dark brown and tan highlights, on Hwy. 87, Adkins. Call Andrea at 623-512-8099.

VideoLost: Pitbull mix, brindle male, answers to Jake, since April 7 on I-37 between 536 and Hardy Rd. No questions, help Jake come home to his family, 361-765-7373.
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

Landscape Forman needed: Must have own transportation. Have knowledge decks, ponds, waterfalls, irrigation Call 830-534-2903
Highway Construction Company has openings for laborers to install guardrail on the highway in San Antonio area. Call 210-633-9268 or 830-216-7420. EOE.
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos





Video Vault ›
You’ve been granted free access to this subscribers only article.

Agriculture Today


Rain may salvage some plantings east of I-45, other areas stressed




E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story
April 27, 2011 | 3,563 views | Post a comment

COLLEGE STATION -- Parts of East Texas and the Coastal Bend received from 1 inch to 1.5 inches of rain on April 4, but the rest of the state got only high winds and cooler temperatures, according to the National Weather Service.

With few exceptions, mainly along the Gulf Coast, the rain did little to roll back the severe to extreme drought conditions hammering the growth of small grains, and pasture and rangeland grasses, said Texas Agrilife Extension Service personnel.

However, in some situations, the rain may have come at just the right time to salvage recently emerged corn and give some hope for wheat to be harvested for grain, AgriLife Extension county agents reported.

The central region remained extremely dry. All tree varieties were showing extreme drought stress, and pecans were budding late. Warm weather forced wheat and oats to begin heading. High winds robbed what was left of topsoil moisture. Rainfall was needed to prevent widespread crop failures and grazing reductions.

There was almost no rain throughout February and March in the coastal bend region. Field crops emerged and needed rain. Dry soils prevented some farmers from planting the rest of their crop. Some were cultivating grain sorghum and cornfields. Warm-season grasses were slow to recover from winter dormancy due to lack of rain. As winter pastures matured, they provided less forage. Some livestock producers continued to have to supply hay and supplemental feed.

In the south, rangeland and pastures, already in poor condition, worsened. A cold front made its way through the area and brought milder temperatures but no rain. Soil-moisture levels were short to very short. Livestock producers were providing supplemental feed at a steady rate.

Also, they were culling calves earlier than normal due to the declining quantity and quality of forages, and very low stock-tank water levels. Ranchers were using windmills and wells to at least provide limited water for livestock.

Compiled from Texas A&M University and Texas AgriLife Extension Service reports.
 

Your Opinions and Comments


Be the first to comment on this story!


You must be logged in to post a comment.




Not a subscriber?
Subscriber, but no password?
Forgot password?

Agriculture Today Archives


Coupons ag-right
East Central Driving SchoolTriple R DC ExpertsAllstate & McBride RealtyVoncille Bielefeld homeHeavenly Touch home

  Copyright © 2007-2016 Wilson County News. All rights reserved. Web development by Drewa Designs.