Sunday, May 29, 2016
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

WCN Site Search


Preview the Paper Preview the Paper

Preview this week's Paper
A limited number of pages are displayed in this preview.
Preview this Week’s Issue ›
Subscribe Today ›

Lost & Found

Reward! Lost: Fox Terrier, white and orange female, named Sara, no collar, went missing May 1, near F.M. 775 and 3432. Call Lindsay at 210-284-0094.

VideoMISSING TORTOISE from S. Palo Alto Dr. in Estates of Eagle Creek on May 17th. If you see him, please contact us @ (210) 913-4558 or (830) 393-4030.
*Includes FREE photo online! mywcn.com/lostandfound
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

Your #1 Advertising Resource! Call 830-216-4519.
Insurance sales rep., no license necessary, will provide all training, compensation includes salary plus commission, full medical benefits, and 401K, transportation required, goal oriented. Call Frank Castillo at 210-900-8140.
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos





Video Vault ›
Richardson Chevrolet homeRE/MAX homeTNMC
You’ve been granted free access to this subscribers only article.

Special Section


SENIOR LIVING: Pill Splitting: When it’s safe, and when it isn’t advisable




E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story
May 10, 2011 | 1,580 views | Post a comment

If you take prescription medications, splitting

your pills -- literally cutting them in half -- could save you a lot of money. But be sure you talk to your doctor first, because not all pills can be split.

The reason pill splitting is such a cost-cutter is because of a quirk in the way drugs are manufactured and priced. A pill that’s twice as strong as another may not be twice the price. In fact, it’s usually about the same price. So, buying a double-strength dose and cutting it in half may allow you to get two months worth of medicine for the price of one. But is it safe? As long as your doctor agrees that splitting your pills is OK for you, you learn how to do it properly, and you split only pills that can be split, there’s really no danger.

What to Do

If you’re interested in pill splitting, the first step is to talk to your doctor or pharmacist to find out if any of the medicines you use can be safely split. It’s also important to find out whether splitting them will save you enough money to justify the hassle.

The pills that are easiest to split are those with a score down the middle. However, not every pill that’s scored is meant to be split. Pills that are most commonly split include:

• Cholesterol lowering drugs, like Crestor, Lipitor,

and Pravachol

• Antidepressants, like Celexa, Paxil, and Zoloft

• High blood pressure medicines like, Monopril,

Prinivil, Univasc,

Zestril, Avapro and Cozaar.

• Erectile dysfunction pills, like Viagra, Cialis and Levitra

Having the right equipment helps too. Don’t use a knife to cut your pills in half. It can cause you to split them unevenly resulting in two pieces with very different dosages, which can be dangerous. Purchase a proper pill cutter. They only cost around $5 to $10 and are available at most pharmacies and large discount stores.

For convenience, you might be tempted to split the whole bottle of pills at once. But check with your doctor first. It’s possible that exposing the interior of the pills to the air could reduce their effectiveness. It’s also important to know that pills are only safely split in half, and never into smaller portions such as into thirds or quarters.

Unsafe Splitting

Many medicines, because of their ingredients or design, cannot be split safely. Here’s a list of pills that should not be split:

• Chemotherapy drugs.

• Anti-seizure medicines.

• Some blood thinners.

• Birth control pills.

• Capsules of any kind that contain powders or gels.

• Pills with a hard outside coating.

• Extended-release pills that deliver medication

over time in your body.

• Pills that are coated to protect your stomach.

• Pills that crumble easily, irritate your mouth, or

taste bitter.

Again, your doctor or pharmacist will know which drugs can and cannot be split. If you’re taking a medicine that can be split, you’ll need to get a prescription from your doctor for twice the dosage you need. Then you can start splitting and saving, safely.
 

Your Opinions and Comments


Be the first to comment on this story!


You must be logged in to post a comment.




Not a subscriber?
Subscriber, but no password?
Forgot password?

Special Section Archives


Drama Kids
Custom Construction LLC
Sherwood Surveying
RS Gate & Supply
John D. Foster home
Hoelschers home
Caraway Ford
Pat Brown Realtors, Inc. home
OSO Construction
Abrego Lake
WCN web hosting
CASA
Allstate & McBride RealtyTriple R DC ExpertsVoncille Bielefeld homeHeavenly Touch home

  Copyright © 2007-2016 Wilson County News. All rights reserved. Web development by Drewa Designs.