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Agriculture Today

Texas is now swine brucellosis free

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May 31, 2011 | 3,265 views | Post a comment

AUSTIN -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) notified the Texas Animal Health Commission on May 19 that the state of Texas had been declared free of swine brucellosis. Texas was the last state to be officially declared free of this disease by the USDA.

Brucellosis in swine is caused by the bacteria Brucella suis. This disease usually affects the reproductive tract in swine, resulting in decreased litter size which leads to economic loss for the producer. Brucellosis bacteria can also affect humans and is known as “undulant fever.”

Since the mid-1990’s, Texas had detected several infected swine herds, and surveillance efforts were put into effect to comply with the national program standards. The surveillance efforts included complete herd testing of affected herds and market swine testing to satisfy the USDA requirements. Close cooperation between the Texas commercial swine industry, local swine producers, the Texas Pork Producers Association, and the state’s animal health commission ultimately led to the free status declaration.

“Texas being declared swine brucellosis free is good news for the Texas swine industry,” said Dr. Dee Ellis, state veterinarian. “This action relieves certain restrictions on the interstate movement of breeding swine from Texas. We will continue our surveillance efforts, however, to help maintain Texas’ Swine Brucellosis Free status.”

For more information about swine brucellosis, visit http://tahc.state.tx.us/animal_health/swine/swine.html .

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