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VideoPlease help my toy Aussie get home..181 & 1604 area. She's an adult,13" & less than 20 pounds. Please call if you see or find her. 210-328-5050
Lost: Cow, black with white face, female, west of La Vernia, near 2831 FM 1346, weighs about 1000 lbs., she is a fence jumper. Anyone with information call 830-534-4675.

VideoFound dog, cream white and black male w/ blue collar walking on hwy 181 by new richardson chevy last night call 2102863515
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Intertek Testing Laboratory in Elmendorf, TX is now hiring for a Project Facilitator. Candidate will respond and follow-up on quote requests and assist in preparation of forecasts and sales reports. Must be able to work independently in a fast-paced, multi-tasking environment with shifting priorities. Qualified individuals send resumes to tracie.stanush@intertek.com.
Live at no charge in upscale apartment as companion for man with autism and intellectual disability, south/downtown San Antonio, foster care through Medicaid Waiver Program, couples may apply, IRS okays wages, nontaxable, background check required. Send resume to mmoyer@satx.rr.com or text for more information 210-382-6369.
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Agriculture Today


Texas is now swine brucellosis free




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May 31, 2011 | 3,218 views | Post a comment

AUSTIN -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) notified the Texas Animal Health Commission on May 19 that the state of Texas had been declared free of swine brucellosis. Texas was the last state to be officially declared free of this disease by the USDA.

Brucellosis in swine is caused by the bacteria Brucella suis. This disease usually affects the reproductive tract in swine, resulting in decreased litter size which leads to economic loss for the producer. Brucellosis bacteria can also affect humans and is known as “undulant fever.”

Since the mid-1990’s, Texas had detected several infected swine herds, and surveillance efforts were put into effect to comply with the national program standards. The surveillance efforts included complete herd testing of affected herds and market swine testing to satisfy the USDA requirements. Close cooperation between the Texas commercial swine industry, local swine producers, the Texas Pork Producers Association, and the state’s animal health commission ultimately led to the free status declaration.

“Texas being declared swine brucellosis free is good news for the Texas swine industry,” said Dr. Dee Ellis, state veterinarian. “This action relieves certain restrictions on the interstate movement of breeding swine from Texas. We will continue our surveillance efforts, however, to help maintain Texas’ Swine Brucellosis Free status.”

For more information about swine brucellosis, visit http://tahc.state.tx.us/animal_health/swine/swine.html .
 

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