Thursday, October 30, 2014
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

Lost & Found

Lost: Black female Chihuahua named Gloomy and black male Chihuahua named Rico, from CR 126, Floresville, missed dearly by their family! Call 210-428-3803. 

VideoLost: Golden/Pyrenees mix dog, Kaiha, last seen Oct. 11, Hwy. 119, Denhawken area, wearing collar (Drama Queen). Please help us find her! Call Billy 210-745-6059.
Found: Calico cat, female, white, orange, and black, on CR 352, La Vernia. 210-667-1052.
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

The 81st & 218th Judicial District Community Supervision and Corrections Department (Adult Probation) is currently seeking a qualified applicant for the position of Supervision Officer for ATASCOSA COUNTY. Requirements: A Bachelor’s degree recognized by the Texas Higher Education Coordination Board in Criminology, Corrections, Criminal Justice, Law Enforcement/Police Science, Counseling, Pre-Law, Social Work, Psychology, Sociology, Human Services Development, Public Administration, or a related field that has been approved by the Community Justice Assistance Division (CJAD), or one year of graduate study in one of the above mentioned fields, or one year experience in full-time casework, counseling, or community or group work that has been approved by CJAD.  This position requires some evening and/or weekend work. Salary: Negotiable, plus Regular State benefits. Closing Date: Resumes will be taken until November 4, 2014. Procedure: Applicants should submit a typed resume and copy of college transcript to: Mario Bazan, Director, 914 Main Street, Ste #120, Jourdanton, TX  78026 The 81st & 218th Judicial District Community Supervision and Corrections Department is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 
Admin Specialist III, position in Floresville, resident of Wilson and/or Karnes County. Experience using Anasazi Software Program or other database software programs and have experience in a medical office.  Requires high school diploma or GED, plus two years of work experience in a field related to the duties of the position. Resume will be accepted but not in lieu of a completed application. Apply at 1005 B. Street, Floresville, or submit application to Camino Real CS Center, Attn: HRS, P.O. Box 725, Lytle, Tx. 78052; fax 830-772-4304. Visit www.caminorealcs.org for details and application. EOE.
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos





Video Vault ›

Commentaries


Crafting a Moral Budget: The only REAL way to go!




E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story

Disclaimer:
The author of this entry is responsible for this content, which is not edited by the Wilson County News or wilsoncountynews.com.
June 9, 2011 | 1382 views | 4 comments

By Ed Feulner

Can the federal government’s spending spree last forever? Of course not. Even when economic growth is strong (hardly the case now, of course), it’s foolish to keep spending more than we take in. Congress is going to have to make some serious cuts. Otherwise, we’ll face a day of serious financial reckoning -- and sooner than we think.

But you know the charge common sense like that opens you up to from some on the Left: You’re heartless. You’ll gut the social safety net. Toss poor people and seniors onto the street. “They don’t want to make Medicare sustainable,” writes New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, “they want to destroy it under the guise of saving it.”

According to this playbook, it’s immoral to suggest restraining the growth of entitlement programs.

Or is it? A recent exchange of letters between Archbishop Timothy Dolan of New York and House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-Wisc.) sheds a very different light on the matter.

His committee’s proposed 2012 budget “is not just about numbers,” Ryan wrote the Catholic prelate, “but about the character and common good of the American people.” Indeed, he said, it takes into accounts the Church’s social teaching regarding the poor.

Who, after all, will suffer the most if government spending continues to soar unabated? “The weakest will be hit three times over,” Ryan wrote, “by rising costs, by drastic cuts to programs they rely on, and by the collapse of individual support for charities that help the hungry, the homeless, the sick, refugees and others in need.”

Look at what’s happening in many European nations. They’re weathering financial crises brought on by years of overspending. So they’re being forced to make “drastic cuts in benefits to the retired, the sick, the poor, and millions of public employees,” Ryan noted.

What irony. If we take the Left’s proposed tack -- cosmetic cuts, no real reform of entitlement programs -- seniors and the poor will take a real hit down the road.

But the committee’s budget, Ryan wrote, “better targets assistance to those in need, repairs the social safety net, and fulfills the mission of health and retirement security for all Americans.”

Yes, some groups would see their welfare end -- “entrenched corporations, the wealthiest Americans,” according to Ryan. Without that the kind of reform, our ballooning federal budget will never get out of the red.

In his reply, Archbishop Dolan didn’t endorse or criticize the budget, of course. But he did thank Ryan for recognizing an often-overlooked truth: Budgets are also moral documents. The values that helped shape our founding continue to affect our policy decisions, even if we are not always conscious of their influence.

Which values? A moral budget requires “fiscal responsibility; sensitivity to the foundational role of the family; the primacy of the dignity of the human person and the protection of all human life,” the archbishop wrote, along with “a concrete solicitude for the poor and the vulnerable.”

It seems paradoxical, but the way to save programs that helps seniors and those in poverty is not to just keep throwing more money at them. If they’re to survive, serious reform is in order. We need to greatly reduce waste, fraud and abuse, and ensure we’re getting help to people who actually need it.

That’s the fiscally responsible thing to do -- and the moral thing.
###

Ed Feulner is president of The Heritage Foundation http://www.heritage.org
 
« Previous Blog Entry (June 9, 2011)
 


Your Opinions and Comments
 
4th Generation Texan  
Sutherland Springs  
June 15, 2011 2:21pm
 
 
Where did all those people ever get the idea that Obama is brilliant? If he is, he is sure doing a good job of hiding it!
 
 
4th Generation Texan  
Sutherland Springs  
June 14, 2011 6:21pm
 
 
Anyone that has paid attention to the debates, and anyone that has done that and is honest knows that Paul Ryans bill WILL NOT effect anyone 55 and over at all. All the ... Read More Read More
 
 
Alvin Charmaine  
June 12, 2011 7:07pm
 
 
So if we're prepared to default on our debt limit because we're broke- why dont we just do the logical thing and default on social security and medicare. Close em. Stop. ... Read More Read More
 
 
Elaine K.  
Floresville  
June 9, 2011 9:39am
 
 
New column posted.
 

Share your comment or opinion on this story!


You must be logged in to post comments:



Other Commentaries
Commentaries
Commentaries page govtrack.us
Commentaries who represents me?
Heavenly Touch homeSacred Heart SchoolBlue Moon Karaoke & DJTriple R DC ExpertsDrama KidsVoncille Bielefeld homeAllstate & McBride RealtyChester WilsonWilson's Auto Chooser

  Copyright © 2007-2014 Wilson County News. All rights reserved. Web development by Drewa Designs.