Saturday, May 23, 2015
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

WCN Site Search


Lost & Found


VideoLOST!!! Black and white long haired cat. Missing since May 17th from the Vintage Oaks subdivision. If found please call (210)288-3033
Lost: 2 dogs, red mixed breed, last seen on 6th St. near skate park in Floresville. Large reward! If found or seen call 210-995-3800 or 210-249-1836. 

VideoFound: Female Dalmatian mix, Center Point area, FM 775 and CR 319, need to find owner. Call 830-928-1296.
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

Seeking individual to work in a local child-care center, paid holidays, etc., must be high school grad or GED. Apply in person at Cubs Country Childcare, 212 FM 1346 in La Vernia.
The Floresville Independent School District is accepting applications for District Wide Transportation Vehicle Mechanic and Mechanic Helper.  Applications may be obtained online at www.fisd.us  Floresville Independent School District Personnel Office is located at 1200 5th St., Floresville, Texas. 830-393-5300 (Office hours: 8:00-4:30). Applications will be accepted until all positions are filled. An Equal Opportunity Employer.
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos





Video Vault ›

Gardening Q&A


Ask the Master Gardeners July 2011




E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story

Disclaimer:
Guadalupe County Master Gardeners is responsible for this content, which is not edited by the Wilson County News or wilsoncountynews.com.

June 29, 2011 | 1,951 views | 4 comments

Q: As dry as it’s been lately, with very little rain, I’m beginning to wonder if I should change my landscape plants to those that will better withstand dry conditions. Which plants seem to be holding up the best?

A: A number of the grasses are doing quite well. My Mexican feather grass is lovely and is spreading all over my front bed (and part of my lawn). That said, remember that it is considered an invasive in California and could get to be so in my front lawn. You can control it by cutting off the seed heads and by cutting back on the water.

Other grasses not invasive include Lindheimer’s Muhly (clumps two to five feet tall), and green and burgundy fountain grass (survives and multiplies with six to twelve inches of annual rainfall).

In my neighbor’s front lawn out by the road is a big patch of Pride of Barbados, Caesalpinia pulcherrima. It freezes to the ground in the winter, but faithfully comes back every spring. The flowers are beautiful and it seems to hold up with very little water.

My hamelia patens (Mexican firebush) also freezes to the ground in the winter, but comes up every spring. I do not water it and it is lovely. Doug Welsh says that in addition to its long blooming season, there are several other significant attributes of the plant. It is very drought tolerant and thrives in most any soil as long as it is well-drained.

My heirloom roses are growing well. As long as I remember to dead head them, they just keep blooming.

Friends have mentioned that their purple cone flower (Echinacea) is surviving the heat as well as blooming. Aggie-horticulture considers this perennial to be robust and drought tolerant, and it is native to the Midwestern and southeastern United States. It prefers full sun to partial shade in fertile, well-drained soils. It works well as a cut flower.

Texas sage, Leucophyllum frutescens, or Cenizo, according to Aggie-horticulture’s Texas Native Plants Database is one of our most outstanding native plants. This medium-sized compact shrub has delicate silvery to gray-green leaves, and displays of purple blooms from summer into fall (assuming it rains). Flowering is triggered by humidity or high soil moisture after rains. Overwatering or poor drainage will quickly kill the shrub, and shade will promote leggy growth and less flowering.

Aggie-horticulture lists the Russian sage, Perovskia atriplicifolia, as a low water use shrub for El Paso. It also does well here. The perennial grows three to four feet tall and three feet wide. It has high heat tolerance.

Clara Mae Marcotte is a Texas Master Gardener with the Texas AgriLife Extension. If you have a question to be answered, call the Master Gardeners at 830-379-1972 or leave a message to be answered. The website is guadalupecountymastergardeners.org. The Master Gardener research library is open Mondays from 8:30 to noon, on the second floor of the Texas AgriLife Extension building, 210 East Live Oak in Seguin. The next MG class begins August 24 and runs to December 7. The cost is $170. For more information or to register, go up on the MG website.
 
‹ Previous Blog Entry
 

Your Opinions and Comments

 
retiredinlavernia  
lavernia  
July 20, 2011 8:08am
 
Thanks for the comments One voice - I think I will build a fence and see what happens - I have allot of time now a days which is why I started gardening in the first place

 
One Voice  
Floresville  
July 20, 2011 4:38am
 
I thought about rabbits - but it seems they would leave tracts too. ... Couldn't be cut ants - They have an obvious trail. ... I wonder about gofers? A critter that would approach the plant from beneath the ground?? ... ... More ›

 
retiredinlavernia  
lavernia  
July 20, 2011 3:27am
 
I planted a garden for the first time this spring and everything was going great in my relatively small raise beds. Most of what I planted were from seeds and they had grown to plants and had even started to produce fruit when ... More ›

 
Ms. S. V.  
Floresville  
July 19, 2011 6:36pm
 
Mesquite seems to do well in this heat and drought.

Share your comment or opinion on this story!


You must be logged in to post a comment.




Not a subscriber?
Subscriber, but no password?
Forgot password?
Gardening-Blog
Pulse Research expires 6/30/15Heavenly Touch homeAllstate & McBride RealtyVoncille Bielefeld homeauto chooserTriple R DC Experts

  Copyright © 2007-2015 Wilson County News. All rights reserved. Web development by Drewa Designs.