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Lost & Found

Lost: Border Collie, black and light brown, 9 months old, wearing a green collar, last seen Sept. 22 near CR 427 in Poth. If found call 210-324-1208.

VideoLost/stolen shih Tzu named Newton. Last seen 9/29/2015 outside house (located by Emmys) If any information, Please contact at 8306608121 or 8306609222
Found: 2 brindle cows, on Sept. 12, at the end of La Gura Rd. in South Bexar County, located between South Loop 1604 and the San Antonio River, Gillett Rd. on east and Schultz Rd. on the west. Call after 8 p.m., 210-310-9206.
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Help Wanted

ON-CALL CRISIS POOL WORKERS NEEDED. Part-time positions are available for after hours “on-call” crisis workers to respond to mental health crisis for Wilson and Karnes Counties. Duties include crisis interventions, assessments, referrals to stabilization services, and referrals for involuntary treatment services according to the Texas Mental Health Laws. You must have at least a Bachelor’s Degree in psychology, sociology, social work, nursing, etc. On-call hours are from 5 p.m.-8 a.m. weekdays, weekends and holidays vary. If selected, you must attend required training and must be able to report to designated safe sites within 1 hour of request for assessment. Compensation is at a rate of $200 per week plus $100 per completed and submitted crisis assessment, and mileage. If interested call Camino Real Community Services, 210-357-0359.
Seeking individual to work in a local child-care center, paid holidays, etc., must be high school grad or GED. Apply in person at Cubs Country Childcare, 212 FM 1346 in La Vernia.
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Keeping the Faith

Don’t grow old, grow up

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Ronnie McBrayer is responsible for this content, which is not edited by the Wilson County News or wilsoncountynews.com.

July 13, 2011 | 1,523 views | 1 comment

The Hebrew word for anger literally means to “blow out your nostrils” or to “smoke.” That’s apropos, for we all know what it is like to get that fire burning and boiling on the inside, only to have it explode out the chimney of our mouths, minds, and fists.

Truly, few things have the incendiary power of anger let off the leash. How much pain has anger caused each of us? How many divorces, wars, irreconcilable differences, failed business partnerships, murders, errant texts, and e-mails have been the result of primal, fully vented rage?

Now, is there such a thing as justifiable anger? Absolutely. But genuine “righteous indignation” is a rarity. The anger that most often consumes us is the anger of offense. We feel insulted, disrespected, or that our rights have somehow been dishonored. Our rage is self-centered, the result of others not doing what we want or expect them to do.

I have a hunch that most of our anger stems from a lack of maturity. See, we move from childhood to adolescence and adulthood when we realize the world does not revolve around us. It’s no wonder the teenage years are full of such rage and angst. In addition to puberty, galloping hormones, changing bodies, and changing family relationships, there is this social coming of age that informs us we are not the center of the universe. Some of us have had our growth stunted at precisely this stage. We are stuck in an adolescent state of immaturity and perpetual offense. We want everything and everybody to orbit around our shining sun, to do and behave as we demand. Frankly, this is a formula for frustration, for it demands of others and the world what cannot be given.

So how do we calm the burning fire within us? Well, we can control everything and everybody around us, forcing them to comply with our will (Let me know how that works out for you), or we can grow up. Francois de Fenelon said it simply: “The moment you stop wanting everything your way, you will be mature. Until then, your life will be full of trouble and agitation.” We don’t have to live with this kind of anger. We can let go of our pride and self-centeredness, and release our grip on our always-defended rights. We can learn to let go, and thus, learn to grow up.

Ronnie McBrayer is the author of Leaving Religion, Following Jesus. He writes and speaks about life, faith, and Christ-centered spirituality. Visit his website at www.ronniemcbrayer.net.
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Your Opinions and Comments

Ms. S. V.  
July 19, 2011 6:31pm
These columns are like a breath of fresh air. Thank you, Ronnie.

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