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Lost & Found


VideoMissing: Male Boxer, since evening of Jan. 4, Hwy. 97 West, rear of Promised Land Creamery, $500 REWARD. Call 830-391-2240 with information.

VideoREWARD. LOST CAT: Gray and white male cat, since Nov. 13, on C.R. 429, Stockdale, wearing a silver collar. Call 512-629-2005 with any information.
Lost: Male Red Nose Pit Bull, "Chevy," wearing an orange collar, friendly, last seen on County Road 403. 830-477-6511 or 830-534-9094.
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Help Wanted

Immanuel Lutheran Church is now hiring for a Youth and Family Ministry Director. Pastoral: Minister to youth and their families during Sunday School and other church programs, being present in their lives outside the church walls, available for common concerns and in crisis situations. Leadership: Recruit and nurture Youth and Family Ministry program. Administration : Manage the planning process and coordinate with Pastor and Youth Committee all regular ministries to youth and their families. This includes youth of all ages on Sunday mornings and mid-week events; assisting with Confirmation, special events, trips and retreats, and parent meetings. Stewardship: Ongoing evaluation of the effectiveness of youth programs, manage youth ministry budget, and collaborate with the sponsors of each Youth group. Ability to build, lead, and empower youth. Ability to implement a ministry vision. Familiarity with Lutheran Doctrine required; must be comfortable teaching it and representing Lutheran Theology. Proficient computer skills using MS Word, Excel, PowerPoint, database, email, internet, and social media. Supervisory experience preferred. Ability to adapt and evaluate curriculum preferred. Must have excellent organization, communication (verbal and written), and listening skills, with a high degree of initiative and accountability. Exceptional interpersonal and relational skills required, with sensitivity to church members and visitors. Understanding and enjoyment of youth and families and guiding their spiritual development. Please send resumes to immanuellavernia@gmail.com or call 830-253-8121.
Senior Accounting Specialist needed in Whitsett, TX, must pass background and drug test, Quickbooks accounting experience necessary, pay based on experience, company benefits. Email resumes to teika@oscenergy.com.
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Scam Central


Red flag warnings about charitable organizations




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Better Business Bureau
September 8, 2011 | 1,165 views | Post a comment

SAN ANTONIO -- As hearts pour out in the heart of Texas, some will donate money, food, bedding and other much needed supplies to the families who lost everything in the historic Central Texas fires. While many are suffering, others will steal those well-intentioned donations and line their own pockets.

Better Business Bureau advises good Samaritans to give their money and items wisely after the recent wildfires that ravished Central Texas.

“Charities do very great things, especially in times of crisis. Unfortunately, there are a lot of people looking to take advantage,” said Carrie A. Hurt, president and CEO of BBB serving Central, Coastal, Southwest Texas and the Permian Basin. “It’s important for people who want to give, to give wisely. Do your homework and make sure your money is going where you want it to -- to the people who need it.”

When looking to donate to a charity, BBB suggests consumers check with the IRS to ensure the organization is registered as a 501(c)(3), ask exactly where their donations will go and choose an organization that has experience in the specific type of relief efforts they are claiming to undertake.

Donors should be especially wary of charities that claim to be associated with law enforcement or firefighters. The Federal Trade Commission cracked down on such organizations in 2009 because of rampant fraud, but the problem continues.

In the state of Texas, any organization claiming affiliation with law enforcement, public safety or veterans is required to register with the state, pay a fee and disclose the amount of money collected that actually goes toward their cause. Many organizations spend a high percentage of their collections on fundraising or administrative costs. Residents can check such organizations out on the Law Enforcement Telephone Solicitation Act database, and call the agency the charity claims to have an affiliation with.

Consumers can also visit www.give.org to view a charity’s complaint history and get more details about the organization before they donate.

When giving to a charity, BBB warns consumers to watch for these red flags:

Lack of information. Someone soliciting for a charity should know details like the percentage of money that actually goes toward the cause, how long the charity has been doing business and the charity’s full name, address and telephone number. Be wary of solicitors who cannot or will not answer your questions.

High-pressure sales. Charities are constantly in need of support. If a solicitor is pressuring you to donate immediately without allowing time to research the organization, reconsider your donation.

Insistence on cash. You should be able to donate using a credit card or check, and get a receipt for your donation. However, do not provide your credit card information to an unsolicited caller. Go “off the call” and contact the organization directly using independently verified contact information.

Avoidance of U.S. mail. If the organization offers to send a courier, use an overnight delivery service or tells you to wire money, walk away. No legitimate charities will use such means.

Prizes. Some callers will insist you won a prize in a contest you never entered then solicit a donation. Such calls are always a scam.

Similar names. Many scammers try to add legitimacy by using a name that is very close to a well-known and respected charity. Check the name closely and make sure you are giving to the right charity.

Claims of association. Callers may claim their organization is associated with BBB or another trusted organization. Always verify such affiliations before giving money.

To check out a charity or find trustworthy businesses, visit bbb.org.
 

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