Sunday, August 30, 2015
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

WCN Site Search


Lost & Found

Lost: Small black and white tortoise shell cat, 1-1/2 years old, since Aug. 8, Country Hills area, La Vernia, very friendly, "Cinnamon" but responds more to "Kitty," rhinestone collar with bell, shots and spayed, family loves and misses her terribly. Reward! 210-725-8082.
*Includes FREE photo online! mywcn.com/lostandfound

Videofound in eagle creek with a collar no tags. very friendly non aggressive. call if he is yours 210-844-1951. clean and healthy
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

Plastic Product Formers, Inc. is accepting applications for a full-time blow-mold operator. Must be willing to perform physical work in an outside environment and work 10-12 hour shifts including overtime. Must be willing to work some weekend and night shifts. Will be required to clean, set-up, operate, and monitor blow-mold equipment while also performing trimming and inspection of production parts. Includes packaging and material handling. Must pass background check and drug test. Excellent benefits offered. Fax 210-635-7999 or apply in person at 7124 Richter Road, Elmendorf, TX.
LANDSCAPERS NEEDED - Local landscape maintenance company seeking full-time laborers looking to grow with the company. Mowing, weed-eating, edging, trimming, etc. Must have experience and transportation to/from work. Serious inquiries call/email now, 210-215-6476 or maintenance@t-scapes.com.
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos





Video Vault ›

Keeping the Faith


Love Doesn’t Succeed. It Shines




E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story

Disclaimer:
Ronnie McBrayer is responsible for this content, which is not edited by the Wilson County News or wilsoncountynews.com.
October 21, 2011 | 1,195 views | 1 comment

“Love others as much as you love yourself,” Jesus told his followers. These words are considerably more than a sugary Sunday School story. For those who take these words to heart, “love others” has profound, life-altering implications, not all of which are warm and fuzzy. Consider the life of Bernard Lichtenberg, arrested seventy years ago this month. His crime: He loved.

Lichtenberg was a Catholic priest serving in Berlin before the outbreak of World War 2. When Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party came to power, he recognized the coming terror better than most, and made it his ambition to help the Jewish people and other persecuted groups.

Lichtenberg spoke and acted boldly in defense of the Jews, and his repeated protests quickly landed on the ears of government officials. Then, as he knew would be the case, these protests landed him in the crosshairs of a Gestapo investigation. After years of tension, Lichtenberg was finally imprisoned for his opposition.

During his interrogation Lichtenberg was given the opportunity to recant his words and change his ways. He would not. Rather, he said: “I reject with my innermost the [deportation of the Jews] with all its side effects, because it is directed against the most important commandment of Christianity, ‘You shall love your neighbor as much as you love yourself’.

“However, since I cannot prevent this governmental measure, I have made up my mind to accompany the deported Jews and Christian Jews into exile, in order to give them spiritual aid. I wish to ask the Gestapo to give me this opportunity.”
Considered irredeemable by the Third Reich, Lichtenberg’s appeal was granted. He was condemned and consigned to the concentration camp at Dachau. Aged, frail, and in a weakened state, Bernard Lichtenberg died while waiting to be deported in November of 1943.

It is hard to say that Father Lichtenberg, almost single-handedly opposing the Nazi war machine, was acting in a reasonable or sensible manner. How could he, as one man, ever hope to achieve “justice” for the oppressed? What could one pulpit minister do to dismantle or otherwise deter such a system of death? Not much, except to be persecuted, imprisoned, or executed.

No, Bernard Lichtenberg was not being practical. He was being love. Such love can appear like madness, leading the follower of Jesus into all manner of impracticality. Loving our neighbors as ourselves means we turn the other cheek when we are assaulted, we abandon the selfishness and power-grubbing ways of this world, we refuse to repay evil with evil, and we forgive others rather than retaliate against them.

The problem is obvious: Loving and living like this will put us in vulnerable, seemingly defenseless positions. To willingly behave this way, in the “real world,” will only get us abused, maligned, taken advantage of, or worse. These “opportunities,” as Lichtenberg called them, clearly aren’t very pragmatic. Yet, pragmatism doesn’t seem to be Christ’s principal concern.

We are instructed to love, following Jesus’ own example, not because it is practical, reasonable, logical, or the safest way to live in the world. We actively participate in this way of Jesus because it gives witness to the good and loving God of heaven.

Not for a minute should we think that unselfishly loving our neighbors will save the world from all hate and violence. It won’t make our membership rolls at the church grow, get more people into the pews on Sunday, or achieve justice for all society. None of these are the point. We love our neighbors as ourselves not because it always “works,” but because it witnesses. Love for others is a clear reflection of the love of God -- and that is the point.

Pope John Paul recognized this decades later when he honored the martyrdom of Bernard Lichtenberg with these words. He said, “It is not the world's applause but the faithful confession of Jesus Christ that is the sign of an authentic disciple of Christ.” This confession may not always “succeed,” but it will always shine as a light in the darkness.

Ronnie McBrayer is a syndicated columnist, speaker, and author. This is an excerpt from his newly released book “The Jesus Tribe.” Visit Ronnie at www.ronniemcbrayer.net.
 
‹ Previous Blog Entry
 

Your Opinions and Comments

 
Elaine K.  
Floresville  
October 21, 2011 3:03pm
 
New post.

Share your comment or opinion on this story!


You must be logged in to post a comment.




Not a subscriber?
Subscriber, but no password?
Forgot password?

Keeping the Faith Archives


Keeping the Faith bio sidebar
Keeping the Faith sidebar button
Voncille Bielefeld homeTriple R DC ExpertsDrama KidsHeavenly Touch homeAllstate & McBride Realtyauto chooser

  Copyright © 2007-2015 Wilson County News. All rights reserved. Web development by Drewa Designs.