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VideoFound baby kitten outside my house boy. Free can't not keep already have a lot of animals
$500 cash reward for the return or information that leads to the return of missing bull, registered polled Hereford with tattoo ID# Z203, distinctive marks on head, yellow tag in right ear, "D" brand on right hip, missing from Hwy. 119 and C.R. 454 intersection. Call Patrick Danysh, 210-827-9331.
Lost: Calf, red and black tiger striped, white faced, Oak Hill Rd. off U.S. Hwy. 87, La Vernia. Call Carrol, 210-488-3071. 
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Help Wanted

The Floresville Independent School District is accepting applications for District Wide Custodian Positions, 2:00 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. shift. Applications may be obtained online at www.fisd.us or contact Sylvia Campa at 830-393-5300 ext. 14002 for appointments. FISD Personnel Office is located at 1200 5th St., Floresville, Texas. 830-393-5300 (Office hours: 8:00-4:00). Applications will be accepted until all positions are filled. An Equal Opportunity Employer.
Seeking individual to work in a local child-care center, paid holidays, etc., must be high school grad or GED. Apply in person at Cubs Country Childcare, 212 FM 1346 in La Vernia.
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Agriculture Today


Every day is ‘Food Day’ in the U.S.




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Lynne Finnerty
October 26, 2011 | 2,616 views | Post a comment

Most likely you’ve heard of Earth Day, the annual celebration of the environment and ways in which we can and do work to protect it. While Earth Day began as an initiative of environmental groups, farmers and ranchers also have celebrated it for the last few years, proclaiming that every day is Earth Day for them, and telling the public how their farming and conservation practices conserve natural resources.

A self-styled food “watchdog” group sponsored the first annual Food Day on Oct. 24. The Center for Science in the Public Interest says the Food Day campaign is about encouraging people to support “healthy, affordable food grown in a sustainable, humane way.” That sounds like something most people can support. The only problem is the Center for Science in the Public Interest’s record of working to limit your food choices and attack today’s agricultural production methods indicates that the group’s Food Day event had an anti-agriculture slant.

The Center is the same group that has called for taxes on soft drinks and limiting consumption of meat and dairy foods. The group is known for issuing pseudo-science reports condemning foods like ice cream and movie popcorn, as if we’re not smart enough to know, without the paternalistic help of the Center for Science in the Public Interest, that these are occasional treats. The group has even taken aim at fruit juice. Of course, the Center used Food Day to ask for donations to continue its efforts.

Interestingly, the Food Day event came one week after World Food Day, celebrated every Oct. 17 since 1981 to recognize the founding of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization and increase awareness of global hunger. Some of the very agricultural methods that the Center for Science in the Public Interest criticizes, such as livestock production and biotechnology, are keys to alleviating hunger and keeping agriculture sustainable.

Despite the dubious motives behind Food Day, a number of groups, including Farm Bureau, the Animal Agriculture Alliance, and the Center for Food Integrity, encouraged all farmers and ranchers to participate and make their voices heard.

Farmers and ranchers should take the opportunity to let the public know that, for them, every day is Food Day. People should hear how today’s agriculture produces the food we need using fewer resources, and why that’s good for people, animals, and the planet.

Miss America 2011 Teresa Scanlan did her part to get the word out about how the thousands of family farms across the country make our safe, abundant, and affordable food supply a reality.

“Not everyone farms, but everybody has to eat,” Scanlan said in a Food Day message on YouTube. “Most Americans don’t realize how essential and crucial agriculture is to our lives and to our economy.” While it’s great to have a spokesperson like Miss America, she can’t do this job by herself.

Visit www.realfarmersrealfood.com to learn more.

Lynne Finnerty is the editor of FBNews, the American Farm Bureau Federation’s official newspaper.
 

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