Saturday, July 4, 2015
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

WCN Site Search


Lost & Found


VideoPlease help my toy Aussie get home..181 & 1604 area. She's an adult,13" & less than 20 pounds. Please call if you see or find her. 210-328-5050
Lost: Calf, red and black tiger striped, white faced, Oak Hill Rd. off U.S. Hwy. 87, La Vernia. Call Carrol, 210-488-3071. 

VideoLost Dog:She is a 14 yr old female blue healer/corgi mix. Last seen on 4th st near Eagle Wrecker. If seen please call 8172435617
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

SS Water Supply is now hiring Meter Reader/Field Technician, full-time position, good driving record, high school graduate, great benefits, starting at $9/hour, opened until filled. Apply at Main Office, 10393 Hwy. 87, La Vernia, TX. 
Billing and Shipping Rep. needed for local manufacturer in Elmendorf. Responsibilities: customer service, sales order entry, bills of lading, Internet sales and shipping, filing, and answering phones. Requirements: high school diploma or GED, packaging and shipping knowledge preferred with DOT and HAZMAT. Excellent benefits offered. Apply in person at 7124 Richter Road, Elmendorf, TX or fax resume to 210-635-7999.
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos





Video Vault ›
You’ve been granted free access to this subscribers only article.

Agriculture Today


Graveyards, mysterious plants




E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story
October 26, 2011 | 2,579 views | Post a comment

By Ann Perry

A U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientist has confirmed the identity of a strange grass-like sedge discovered in a Mississippi graveyard, and believes the appearance of the potentially invasive plant is linked to the final resting places of several members of a royal Gypsy family.

Agricultural Research Service botanist Charles Bryson was asked by Mississippi State University graduate student Lucas Majure to help classify a plant Majure had found in Rose Hill Cemetery in Meridian, Miss. Bryson works at the Agricultural Research Service Crop Production Systems Research Unit in Stoneville, Miss. The Agricultural Research Service is the USDA’s chief intramural scientific research agency.

After several months of searching, Bryson identified the plant as blue sedge (Carex breviculmis), a native of Asia and Australia and previously unknown in North America. He also found it growing along railroad tracks, campgrounds used by transients, and in or around four cemeteries in Meridian, including Rose Hill Cemetery.

Visitors from all over the world come to Rose Hill Cemetery to pay their respects at the gravesite of Kelly Mitchell, the Queen of the Gypsies, who was buried there in 1915. Her husband and other family members were also laid to rest in the cemetery.

Given the plant’s restricted and distinctive distribution in the region, Bryson thinks that global travelers introduced the sedge to Mississippi, possibly via seeds trapped in clothing or by leaving plants or soil at the gravesites of the Gypsy royalty. Then cemetery caretakers may have spread plant material from the first introduction site to the other cemeteries via contaminated clothing and lawn-care equipment.

At two sites where it is now established, the plant exhibits weedy characteristics and reproduces and spreads profusely. To Bryson, these traits suggest that the Old World sedge could someday cause problems in U.S. lawn and turf systems, as well as in fruit and nut crop production.

Bryson and Majure published their findings in the Journal of the Botanical Research Institute of Texas.

Ann Perry is a public affairs specialist for the USDA Agricultural Research Service.
 

Your Opinions and Comments


Be the first to comment on this story!


You must be logged in to post a comment.




Not a subscriber?
Subscriber, but no password?
Forgot password?

Agriculture Today Archives


Coupons ag-right
auto chooserHeavenly Touch homeVoncille Bielefeld homeAllstate & McBride RealtyDrama KidsTriple R DC Experts

  Copyright © 2007-2015 Wilson County News. All rights reserved. Web development by Drewa Designs.