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VideoLost: Female Blue Heeler from C.R. 359 in La Vernia, on Thurs., May 14, has collar and tag. Call if found or seen, 210-289-4268.

VideoLost: Male miniature black/tan Dachshund and small female shaggy dog, white w/black face, may have their puppy with them, on May 12 in Creekwood Subdivision. Call if found, 210-243-8277.
Found: Yellow Lab on Hwy. 97 East in Floresville, has collar, no tags. 210-748-1153.
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Help Wanted

Paramedics FT/PRN - Wilson County ESD #3 is a 911 Provider seeking Paramedics for 12 and 24 hour shifts. We operate Frazer Units using modern technology to include Life Pak 15, Lucas 2, Pentax Airway System, EPCR and Aggressive Protocols.  We offer Holiday Pay, Health Benefits and competitive pay. To apply please visit our office, 111 State Highway 123 North, Stockdale, to inquire call 830-996-3087, or email your resume to barbara.duncan@wcesd3.com.
The Floresville Independent School District is accepting applications for: Grounds Worker/Labor, 260 days, 5 days a week, 8 hour workday. Primary Purpose: To help maintain the physical school plant in a condition of operating excellence so that full educational use of it may be made at all times. Applications may be submitted online at www.fisd.us. FISD Personnel Office is located at 1200 5th St., Floresville, Texas, 830-393-5300, (Office hours: 8:00–4:30). Applications will be accepted until all positions are filled. An Equal Opportunity Employer. 
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Posted in Food Prices, Healthy Eating, Hot off the Press




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The author of this entry is responsible for this content, which is not edited by the Wilson County News or wilsoncountynews.com.
November 30, 2011 | 2,214 views | 1 comment

By Amanda Hill

Science is an amazing thing. Think about some of the advancements we’ve made in the past 100 years: new medicines have advanced the average lifespan from 49.2 years at the turn of the century to 77.5 years in 2003; cars don’t just take us from point A to point B, but they also tell us how to get there; and through complicated communications networks, we can reach our friends and family in an instant--anytime, anywhere.

Science has progressed nearly every area of our life, including the food we eat. Farmers have used technology to grow more food for more people on essentially the same amount of land. In 1941, one farmer could feed 19 people each year. Now one farmer feeds 155 people.

Farmers are able to grow considerably more, thanks in part to advancements in genetic engineering. Some consumers are concerned with the safety of genetically engineered food, but the modified seeds grow just like any other seed that has been naturally crossbred and grown in fields for years.

Scientists are able to take traits from one plant and introduce that trait to another. For example, one plant may be more resistant to bugs or weeds. By planting these improved seeds, farmers are able to grow food in conditions that otherwise would leave their fields bare. Scientists are even working on crops that are resistant to drought. Imagine what could be grown--even during a historic drought here in Texas.

So what’s next? Scientists are working to improve the health benefits of food through genetic engineering. They are able to identify genes with higher amounts of antioxidants and vitamin C and introduce those traits to fresh produce.
To me, that’s pretty amazing. In a time when just about any product, including soda, is marketed for increased antioxidants and vitamins, I welcome a more healthy option in fresh fruits and vegetables.

In fact, a recent study by Iowa State University researcher Wallace Huffman found that consumers not only want genetically engineered foods with added health benefits, but they are willing to pay up to 25 percent more for them. It makes sense. Organic farmers receive a premium for their products. Why wouldn’t consumers pay more for foods with added nutrients?

Not everyone will agree that genetically engineered foods are right for them, but science has given us options. American consumers are given the choice of a wide variety of products and can purchase what they like.

What do you think? Would you pay a premium for fruits and vegetables with antioxidants and vitamins added through science? From the Texas Farm Bureau
 
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Elaine K.  
Floresville  
November 30, 2011 10:23am
 
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