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VideoLost/stolen shih Tzu named Newton. Last seen 9/29/2015 outside house (located by Emmys) If any information, Please contact at 8306608121 or 8306609222

VideoMissing Chihuahua off 775 across from the Woodlands on Sept. 26th. Spy is very small, he is Black, Tan, & White. Spy is missed dearly. Please contact 830-391-5055.
Found: 2 brindle cows, on Sept. 12, at the end of La Gura Rd. in South Bexar County, located between South Loop 1604 and the San Antonio River, Gillett Rd. on east and Schultz Rd. on the west. Call after 8 p.m., 210-310-9206.
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Salespersons needed for mobile home sales, Pleasanton and San Antonio, salary plus commission. 830-569-8109.
Office help needed, MUST HAVE QuickBook experience, some experience in bookkeeping, answering calls, filing, organization, and advertising for the company; starting pay $12, hours are 11:30-5 p.m. Monday-Friday, may become full-time. Must have recommendation letter. Only serious applicants willing to grow with the company need apply. Send resume to sfreeman@dilmakair.com.
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Agriculture Today

Weather Whys

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December 14, 2011 | 3,992 views | Post a comment

Q: You often hear the term “black ice.” What is it?

A: It’s not really black, but it is ice that is extremely dangerous, says Brent McRoberts of Texas A&M University. Black ice is ice that appears to be very dark or even black because it is transparent -- it is reflecting the color of the asphalt on the road. “Black ice is a thin layer of ice on the road and it often looks wet, not especially icy. So it can be hard to notice from a distance, and for this reason it is dangerous to drive or walk on,” McRoberts explains.

Q: Is it more dangerous than regular ice?

A: It is almost always more dangerous, McRoberts reports. “Black ice often forms at night and early in the morning, when temperatures are low but traffic is high,” he adds. “Sunlight can often melt it because it is such a thin layer of ice, but black ice can last longer on roads that are protected by shade. One study in Sweden a few years ago showed that there are five times more accidents on roads that have black ice than on dry roads and twice as many accidents as on roads that had packed snow. That’s why sanding crews are always important when an ice storm is about to hit.”

Weather Whys is a service of the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at Texas A&M University. Visit http://tamunews.tamu.edu. Follow us on Twitter at http://twitter.com/tamu.

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