Thursday, December 8, 2016
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

WCN Site Search


Preview the Paper Preview the Paper

Preview this week's Paper
A limited number of pages are displayed in this preview.
Preview this Week’s Issue ›
Subscribe Today ›

Lost & Found


VideoPlease help me find my dog. His name is Archie and was last seen on black jack road. My contact information is,210.919.0183

VideoFound 12/6 on CR417 in Stockdale. Super-sweet and friendly - seems well-loved. No tags/collar. Are you her family? Call 830-391-1966.

Videomissing black lab. please return small cash reward. no questions asked. his family miss him very much 2818256707.
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

Dean & Peeler Meatworks Custom Butchery in Poth, Texas will be opening in early 2017 and is searching for a head butcher and qualified meat cutters. This will be a cattle only federally inspected facility focusing on full high quality fabrication for customers and private labels. Those individuals interested contact us at 806-789-6359 or email dustin_dean@hotmail.com.
Caregivers needed. Call 830-625-0444.
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos





Video Vault ›
City Base PlumbingPursch with auto packageOSO construction breaking

Breaking News


Preliminary estimates show hundreds of millions of trees killed by 2011 drought




E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story
December 20, 2011, 12:47pm
2,012 views | Post a comment

SOURCE: Texas Forest Service

COLLEGE STATION, Texas -- As many as 500 million trees scattered across the Lone Star State have died this year as a result of the unrelenting drought, according to preliminary estimates from Texas Forest Service.

The numbers were derived by Texas Forest Service foresters, who canvassed local forestry professionals, gathering information from them on the drought and its effect on trees in their respective communities.

Each forestry expert estimated the percentage of trees in their region that have died as a result of the 2011 drought. That percentage was applied to the estimated number of trees in the region, a figure determined by the agency’s Forest Inventory & Analysis (FIA) program.

Using this approach, an estimated 100 million to 500 million trees with a diameter of 5 inches or larger were estimated to have succumbed to the drought. That range is equivalent to 2 to 10 percent of the state’s 4.9 billion trees.

“In 2011, Texas experienced an exceptional drought, prolonged high winds and record-setting temperatures. Together, those conditions took a severe toll on trees across the state,” said Burl Carraway, Sustainable Forestry department head. “Large numbers of trees in both urban communities and rural forests have died or are struggling to survive. The impacts are numerous and widespread.”

The preliminary estimates indicate three multi-county areas appear to be the hardest hit. The area including Sutton, Crockett, western Kimble and eastern Pecos counties saw extensive mortality among Ashe junipers.

The area including Harris, Montgomery, Grimes, Madison and Leon counties saw extensive mortality among loblolly pines. Western Bastrop and eastern Caldwell counties, as well as surrounding areas, saw extensive mortality among cedars and post oaks.

Additionally, localized pockets of heavy mortality were reported for many other areas.

Texas Forest Service foresters plan to use aerial imagery to conduct a more in-depth analysis in the spring, which is when trees that may have gone into early dormancy -- an act of self-preservation -- could begin to make a comeback.

A more scientific, long-term study will be completed as the agency collects data through its FIA program. Considered a census for trees, the federally-funded program allows the agency to keep a close watch on trees -- and how they’re growing and changing -- across the state.

As part of the program, foresters are tasked with surveying certain, designated plots of land each year. Because the state is so big, it takes a decade to complete a full inventory cycle.

“Quantifying the impacts of a statewide drought on tree survival is no small task,” Carraway said, noting that Texas was home to 63 million acres of forestland, much of which is in remote areas.

“During this time of year, it’s difficult to tell in some cases if a tree is truly dead. And keep in mind that the drought is ongoing. We fully expect mortality percentages to increase if the drought continues.”
 

Your Opinions and Comments


Be the first to comment on this story!


You must be logged in to post a comment.




Not a subscriber?
Subscriber, but no password?
Forgot password?

Breaking News Archives


Malcolm's Custom Welding
WCN Citizens Forum 5/28/15
Southern Electric
Triple R DC ExpertsFriesenhahn Custom WeldingVoncille Bielefeld homeAllstate & McBride RealtyHeavenly Touch home

  Copyright © 2007-2016 Wilson County News. All rights reserved. Web development by Drewa Designs.