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Savvy Senior


Helping the elderly to stop driving




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Disclaimer:
Jim Miller is responsible for this content, which is not edited by the Wilson County News or wilsoncountynews.com.
Jim Miller
The Savvy Senior
February 22, 2012 | 1446 views | Post a comment

Dear Savvy Senior,

I’m worried about my father’s driving. At age 84, his driving skills have diminished significantly, but I know he’s bound and determined to keep going as long as he’s alive. What tips can you recommend that can help me help my dad stop driving?

Nervous Daughter

Dear Nervous,

For many families, telling an elderly parent it’s time to give up the car keys is a very sensitive and difficult topic. While there’s no one simple way to handle this issue, here are a number of tips and resources you can try to help ease your dad away from driving.

Take a Ride

To get a clear picture of your dad’s driving abilities, the first thing you need to do is take a ride with him watching for problem areas. For example: Does he drive too slow or too fast? Does he tailgate or drift between lanes? Does he have difficulty seeing, backing up, or changing lanes? Does he react slowly? Does he get distracted or confused easily? Also, has your dad had any fender benders or tickets lately, or have you noticed any dents or scrapes on his vehicle? These, too, are red flags.

Start Talking

After your assessment, you need to have a talk with your dad about your concerns, but don’t sound alarmed. If you begin with a dramatic outburst like “Dad, you’re going to kill someone!” you’re likely to trigger resistance. Start by gently expressing that you’re worried about his safety.

For tips on how to talk to your dad about this touchy topic, the Hartford Financial Services Group and MIT AgeLab offer some guides titled “Family Conversations with Older Drivers” and “Family Conversations about Alzheimer’s Disease, Dementia & Driving” that can help, along with an online seminar called “We Need to Talk” that was produced by AARP. To access these free resources, visit safedrivingforalifetime.com.

Like many elderly seniors, your dad may not even realize his driving skills have slipped. If this is the case, consider signing him up for an older driver refresher course through AARP (aarp.org/drive, 888-227-7669), your local AAA, or a driving school.

By becoming aware of his driving limitations, your dad may be able to make some simple adjustments -- like driving only in daylight or on familiar routes -- that can help keep him safe and driving longer. Or, he may decide to hang up the keys on his own.

Refuses To Quit

If, however, you believe your dad has reached the point that he can no longer drive safely, but he refuses to quit, you have several options. One possible solution is to suggest a visit to his doctor who can give him a medical evaluation, and if warranted, “prescribe” that he stops driving. Older people will often listen to their doctor before they will listen to their own family.

If that doesn’t do it, ask him to get a comprehensive driving evaluation done by a driver rehabilitation specialist -- this can cost several hundred dollars. A driving evaluation will test your dad’s cognition, vision, and motor skills, as well as his on-road driving abilities. To locate a specialist in your area, contact the Association of Driver Rehabilitation Specialists (driver-ed.org, 866-672-9466) or the American Occupational Therapy Association (aota.org/older-driver).

If he still refuses to move to the passenger seat, call your local Department of Motor Vehicles to see if they can help. Or, call in an attorney to discuss with your dad the potential financial and legal consequences of a crash or injury. If all else fails, you may just have to take away his keys.

Arrange Transportation

Once your dad stops driving, he’s going to need other ways to get around, so help him create a list of names and phone numbers of family, friends, and local transportation services that he can call on. To locate community transportation services, call the Area Agency on Aging. Call 1-800-677-1116 for contact information.

Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC “Today” show and author of The Savvy Senior book. Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org.
 
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