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Lost & Found

Lost: Small black/white tortoise shell cat, 1-1/2 years old, Aug. 8, Country Hills area, La Vernia, friendly, "Cinnamon" but responds to "Kitty," rhinestone collar w/bell, shots, spayed. Reward! 210-725-8082.

VideoLost: Shih Tzu, male, golden brown, from C.R. 320 in Floresville. If you have any information call 210-452-1829 or 832-292-3305.

VideoBoxer mix found with red collar in Floresville. Good with kids and other dogs. Very obedient. If owner doesnt respond in the next week he is free to good home.
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*Fair Housing notice. All help wanted advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference limitation or discrimination." This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for help wanted ads, which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
Sorting department for a local fundraising facility is hiring immediately. Apply in person at 1371 F.M. 1346, La Vernia, TX 78121.
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South Texas Living


Healthy Living: Is swimming after eating dangerous?




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Charles Stuart Platkin, PhD.
April 11, 2012 | 2,262 views | Post a comment

Why shouldn’t you swim after you eat -- is it dangerous?

“No, it is not dangerous,” said University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas Professor Lona Sandon. “You could get an uncomfortable stomach cramp, but that goes for any activity after eating. When we eat, blood rushes to the stomach and intestines to get the digestive muscles moving. If we begin exercising during this process, the blood is diverted back to the working muscles in the legs or other body parts needed during exercise.

“This leaves the digestive tract in a bit of a lurch, slowing down digestion and increasing the potential for cramping. This also leaves a mass of food in your digestive tract that can make you feel uncomfortable and bloated,” Sandon said. She recommends waiting 30 minutes before attempting vigorous activity.

Charles Stuart Platkin, Ph.D., is a nutrition and public health advocate and founder of DietDetective.com.
 

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