Tuesday, February 9, 2016
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

WCN Site Search


Preview the Paper Preview the Paper

Preview this week's Paper
A limited number of pages are displayed in this preview.
Preview this Week’s Issue ›
Subscribe Today ›

Lost & Found

Bear, please come home! Missing since October 22, 2014, black Manx cat (no tail), shy. Reward! Help him find his way home. 210-635-7560.
Lost: Female German Shepherd, about 2 years old, pink collar, lost from Hickory Hill/Great Oaks Subdivisions off FM 539, La Vernia, on Thurs., Feb. 4. Reward! 830-947-3465.
Found: Basset Hound, Hwy. 97 W./Hospital Blvd., Floresville. Call 830-391-2153 between 9 a.m.-11:30 p.m.
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

Hiring lawn maintenance laborers, transportation needed to get to Elmendorf yard, 4+ years experience is mandatory, must have clean record, work available year round, great pay. Call for phone interview, 512-359-2640.
*Fair Housing notice. All help wanted advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference limitation or discrimination." This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for help wanted ads, which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos





Video Vault ›
TNMCRichardson Chevrolet homeRE/MAX home

Consumer Updates


Research “green” claims before spending all your green




E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story

Disclaimer:
The author of this entry is responsible for this content, which is not edited by the Wilson County News or wilsoncountynews.com.
Better Business Bureau
April 20, 2012 | 2,201 views | Post a comment

SAN ANTONIO, Texas -- Nowadays, it is hard for consumers to go shopping without being bombarded with products advertised as “environmentally safe,” “degradable” and “ozone friendly,” but how does a consumer have confidence in a product or service advertising itself as “green?”

The Federal Trade Commission, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, has developed guidelines -- called Green Guides -- for advertisers to ensure that their environmental marketing claims don’t mislead consumers. While these guidelines are not enforceable as law, the FTC can take action if it deems a company’s marketing to be unfair or deceptive.

Under the Green Guides, a company can no longer label a product as “green” or “eco-friendly” to imply general environmental benefits. The claim must be linked to a specific product benefit.

For example, a product could be touted as degradable only if it breaks down within a year. The old guidelines allowed that claim if the product broke down in a “reasonably short period,” but didn’t define the period. Products advertised as compostable have to break down as fast as the materials they are composted with, such as plants and other organic materials that consumers might put in a backyard compost bin.

In addition, the guides caution marketers not to use unqualified certifications or seals of approval that do not specify the basis for the certification. All qualifications marketers apply to certifications or seals should be clear, prominent and specific.

BBB encourages you to check out any and all products, services and marketers making “green” claims before spending your green:

· Do your research. Take the time to research a product and the manufacturer to find more information about the product and its greenness.

· Be cautious of fluffy language or concrete claims. “Fuzzy claims” such as “environmentally friendly” or “100 percent natural” without solid examples to back up the claim can be misleading. Look for specific information and substantiation of all claims.

· Confirm certifications. Companies can create a logo to intentionally look like it’s a third party certification for their environmental claims. Research any third-party carefully before accepting its “stamp of approval.”

· Know where to turn if you have questions. Visit the FTC Environmental Marketing Claims Guidelines for more information on green products and green advertising. If you believe a business is engaged in deceptive advertising file a complaint with your BBB and the FTC.

To check the reliability of a company and find trustworthy businesses, visit bbb.org.
 
‹ Previous Blog Entry
 

Your Opinions and Comments


Be the first to comment on this story!


You must be logged in to post a comment.




Not a subscriber?
Subscriber, but no password?
Forgot password?

Consumer Updates Archives


WCN Citizens Forum 5/28/15
John D. Foster home
Drama Kids
Hoelschers home
Caraway Ford
Cowboy Masonry & Custom Pools
Pat Brown Realtors, Inc. home
Abrego Lake
RS Gate & Supply
WCN web hosting
Sherwood Surveying
Custom Construction LLC
Allstate & McBride RealtyVoncille Bielefeld homeHeavenly Touch homeTriple R DC ExpertsEast Central Driving School

  Copyright © 2007-2016 Wilson County News. All rights reserved. Web development by Drewa Designs.