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Lost & Found

Found, PRESCRIPTION GLASSES beside Sunnyside Rd. Call 210-288-8038
Our beloved Gracie is missing, Dachshund/Lab mix, microchipped, about 30 pounds, black with little white. Call with any information, 830-393-9999 or 419-250-9099.
Found: Large male dog, beige/light brown, approx. 6-7 months old, very sweet, no collar, near F.M. 537 and 427 off Hwy. 181. Call 830-393-9999 or 419-250-9099.
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Help Wanted

CASA OUTREACH COORDINATOR, FULL-TIME POSITION, provides professional staff support to CASA volunteers to ensure that the best interests of abused children in the foster care system are represented in court. Social services experience required. Responsible for recruiting and facilitating advocate training, making community presentations, and coordinating cases in Wilson and Karnes Counties with Atascosa County (home office). Must demonstrate written and oral communication skills. Must be available to work intermittent evenings/weekends with some travel.  Must pass background checks, have personal car, current TDL, and auto liability insurance. Call CASA of South Texas at 830-569-4696 for application, or e-mail request to casajoni@att.net by July 28.
Service Technician Assistant. Job description: Assist technician in propane tank installation, gas piping, shop work and repairs. Paid training, paid uniform, family insurance (medical and dental), paid holidays and vacation. Will need to pass a physical, background check, and drug/alcohol test. Call Kathleen, 830-393-2533, Smith Gas Company.
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Consumer Updates


Research “green” claims before spending all your green




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Disclaimer:
The author of this entry is responsible for this content, which is not edited by the Wilson County News or wilsoncountynews.com.
Better Business Bureau
April 20, 2012 | 2,266 views | Post a comment

SAN ANTONIO, Texas -- Nowadays, it is hard for consumers to go shopping without being bombarded with products advertised as “environmentally safe,” “degradable” and “ozone friendly,” but how does a consumer have confidence in a product or service advertising itself as “green?”

The Federal Trade Commission, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, has developed guidelines -- called Green Guides -- for advertisers to ensure that their environmental marketing claims don’t mislead consumers. While these guidelines are not enforceable as law, the FTC can take action if it deems a company’s marketing to be unfair or deceptive.

Under the Green Guides, a company can no longer label a product as “green” or “eco-friendly” to imply general environmental benefits. The claim must be linked to a specific product benefit.

For example, a product could be touted as degradable only if it breaks down within a year. The old guidelines allowed that claim if the product broke down in a “reasonably short period,” but didn’t define the period. Products advertised as compostable have to break down as fast as the materials they are composted with, such as plants and other organic materials that consumers might put in a backyard compost bin.

In addition, the guides caution marketers not to use unqualified certifications or seals of approval that do not specify the basis for the certification. All qualifications marketers apply to certifications or seals should be clear, prominent and specific.

BBB encourages you to check out any and all products, services and marketers making “green” claims before spending your green:

· Do your research. Take the time to research a product and the manufacturer to find more information about the product and its greenness.

· Be cautious of fluffy language or concrete claims. “Fuzzy claims” such as “environmentally friendly” or “100 percent natural” without solid examples to back up the claim can be misleading. Look for specific information and substantiation of all claims.

· Confirm certifications. Companies can create a logo to intentionally look like it’s a third party certification for their environmental claims. Research any third-party carefully before accepting its “stamp of approval.”

· Know where to turn if you have questions. Visit the FTC Environmental Marketing Claims Guidelines for more information on green products and green advertising. If you believe a business is engaged in deceptive advertising file a complaint with your BBB and the FTC.

To check the reliability of a company and find trustworthy businesses, visit bbb.org.
 
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