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VideoFound dog, cream white and black male w/ blue collar walking on hwy 181 by new richardson chevy last night call 2102863515
$500 cash reward for the return or information that leads to the return of missing bull, registered polled Hereford with tattoo ID# Z203, distinctive marks on head, yellow tag in right ear, "D" brand on right hip, missing from Hwy. 119 and C.R. 454 intersection. Call Patrick Danysh, 210-827-9331.

VideoLost Dog:She is a 14 yr old female blue healer/corgi mix. Last seen on 4th st near Eagle Wrecker. If seen please call 8172435617
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Live at no charge in upscale apartment as companion for man with autism and intellectual disability, south/downtown San Antonio, foster care through Medicaid Waiver Program, couples may apply, IRS okays wages, nontaxable, background check required. Send resume to mmoyer@satx.rr.com or text for more information 210-382-6369.
Service Technician Assistant. Job description: Assist technician in propane tank installation, gas piping, shop work and repairs. Paid training, paid uniform, family insurance (medical and dental), paid holidays and vacation. Will need to pass a physical, background check, and drug/alcohol test. Must be willing to obtain a CDL license in the future for backup driver position. Call Kathleen, 830-393-2533, Smith Gas Company.
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South Texas Living


Healthy Living: When love hurts, your brain feels the pain




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April 25, 2012 | 2,338 views | Post a comment

Have you ever been in a relationship that came to an abrupt end? If so, you fully understand why heartbreak is an appropriate description of what you felt. You don’t have to be left at the altar to feel intense feelings of rejection. Maybe a friendship fades away or ends in misunderstanding or a falling out. Heartbreak takes many forms when love appears to be lost. The worst part can be living with the pain of rejection.

If you’ve known heartache, you know that emotional pain feels as real as physical pain even though there are no physical injuries, conditions, or visual scars to contend with. So why can emotional pain make you feel like you’ve fallen off a horse and don’t know how to get back on your feet again?

The answer is in your brain. New cognitive neuroscience research tells us that heartbreak is similar to experiencing actual physical pain. That’s because our brain triggers sensations in reaction to emotional heartbreak that make our body feel like it has been subjected to physical pain. Researchers who have analyzed people who suffered from an intense rejection say that rejection is so painful it appears to be similar to how people feel when they’ve been physically hurt.

One reason for the pain is that intense emotions that are present with a broken relationship are hard to let go. It’s easy for people to want to review every event leading up to a lost relationship, over and over again. They feel compelled to find out how they could have done things differently. Sad memories only make them feel worse.

Neuroscience researchers have found that when participants (whose brains were scanned) were asked to think about heartbreak or were shown a photo of the one that got away, their brain reacted as if their body was feeling physical pain.

What can we learn from heartache knowing how our brains react to emotional pain? Here are some ideas:

•Don’t minimize the pain you feel. Tell yourself that you will feel better over time. Just like the old adage that says time heals all wounds, give yourself time. Don’t rush a renewal of these complex emotions.

•Take one day at a time. Tell yourself you will get through this.

•Pay attention to symptoms and signs of depression like insomnia, or a loss of appetite. If these signs persist, talk to someone who is experienced in treating depression.

•Take time to be good to yourself. Make certain you put something on your calendar every day that you can look forward to. It could be as simple as reading a new book or inviting a friend over to watch TV and chat.

•Make sure you get a good night’s sleep. Quality sleep will help you greet each day with renewed optimism.

•Don’t isolate yourself. Build your confidence by connecting with people. After a rejection, reach out to new friends as well as people who you haven’t seen in a while.

•Look for opportunities to build self-esteem by accomplishing something new. Maybe you wanted to take a woodworking class or learn a new language. Start searching for activities that interest you. You’ll feel good about yourself when you take that first step toward a new beginning.
 

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