Friday, September 4, 2015
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

WCN Site Search


Lost & Found


VideoFound: Male dog in Eagle Creek, with collar no tags, clean and healthy, very friendly, non aggressive. Call if he's yours, 210-844-1951. 
Lost: Small black/white tortoise shell cat, 1-1/2 years old, Aug. 8, Country Hills area, La Vernia, friendly, "Cinnamon" but responds to "Kitty," rhinestone collar w/bell, shots, spayed. Reward! 210-725-8082.

VideoLost: Shih Tzu, male, golden brown, from C.R. 320 in Floresville. If you have any information call 210-452-1829 or 832-292-3305.
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

Seeking full-time/part-time individual to work at Little Bear Child Care Center, must have high school diploma or GED. Apply in person at 12992 Hwy. 87 West, La Vernia.
First Lutheran Church in Floresville is seeking a Director of Youth and Family Ministry, part-time 20 hours/week. Qualifications: Have active worship life and ongoing growth in faith, understanding of Lutheran-Christian tradition, ability to work with both adults and youth, basic computer and organizational skills. Director will disciple both parents and youth grades 1-12, establish appropriate caring relationships with youth, seek opportunities to connect with youth in their environment on their schedule, organize parents into groups for children's ministry work, arrange at least 3 annual local events or trips for Sr. high youth, recruit and encourage youth and adults to take positions of shared leadership and involvement, create and implement means for regular communication with parents and youth, manage youth and family ministry calendar in collaboration with staff, parents, and youth. Applications accepted thru Sept. 15. To apply call 830-393-2747.
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos





Video Vault ›
You’ve been granted free access to this subscribers only article.

Agriculture Today


Texas gold columbines can ‘pop’ your lawn




E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story

April 25, 2012 | 3,936 views | Post a comment

Q. Tell us more about the Texas gold columbine.

A. Texas gold columbines are blooming now in area landscapes. They do most of their growing in the fall, winter, and spring. Summer is their rest period. Texas gold columbines are desirable plants for San Antonio landscapes for several reasons. The yellow blooms resemble “shooting stars” as they emerge from the foliage on stalks that reach 3 feet tall. The foliage is an attractive soft green that reminds me of maidenhair fern. Thirdly, Texas gold columbine is shade tolerant. It grows best under deciduous trees or even sparsely foliated live oaks.

This exceptional plant is described as a weak perennial because the individual plants are short-lived. To make up for it, Texas gold columbine reseeds itself. To take advantage of reseeding, avoid mulching around Texas gold columbines.

Q. I have a Magnolia tree that I have had about three, maybe four years now. I would guesstimate its height to be about 20 feet. My question is what could be causing some of the leaves to turn brown? I have read that it could be caused by lack of water or too much water. Considering the spring we have had, I cannot imagine it is a lack of water. Is this something to be concerned about and/or what is the recommended treatment? The tree currently has several buds and has bloomed every year.

A. Magnolias have a very difficult time obtaining iron from our soils. They are acid lovers. The symptoms are caused by that difficulty. The tree is trying to grow in response to the wonderful conditions this spring, but probably has a damaged root system from last year’s drought. If good conditions continue, it should grow through it, but they are always sensitive to the stresses of our soil and erratic rainfall.

Q. We have a neighbor that grows a small red carnation-like flower that he calls “German carnation.” Do you know anything about it?

A. German carnation is a perennial that produces blood-red blooms. The blooms resemble the florist shop blooms in miniature. I have had best luck growing this perennial in morning sun, in a raised bed. To maintain a bed I had to treat them as other weak perennials and divide the clumps every few years. German carnations have existed in New Braunfels gardens for the entire history of the city.

Q. Why don’t area gardeners grow more Heirloom tomatoes? I think the old-fashioned tomatoes taste best.

A. Most Heirloom tomatoes are indeterminate growers. They grow foliage as long as the weather is good. By the time they start setting fruit, it is too hot for much success.

We have better luck in producing fruit if we use a determinate tomato that grows a reasonable amount of foliage and then concentrates on setting fruit while the temperatures are still mild. Among the best are Tycoon, BHN 602, Celebrity, 444, Solar Fire, Sunpride, and Phoenix.

Calvin Finch is a horticulturist and the San Antonio Water System’s director of water resources. Hear him on “Gardening South Texas” on KLUP 930 AM radio Saturdays noon to 2 p.m., and 1-3 p.m. Sundays. Or, email him at reader@wcn-online.com.
 

Your Opinions and Comments


Be the first to comment on this story!


You must be logged in to post a comment.




Not a subscriber?
Subscriber, but no password?
Forgot password?

Agriculture Today Archives


Coupons ag-right
Voncille Bielefeld homeHeavenly Touch homeTriple R DC ExpertsAllstate & McBride RealtyDrama Kidsauto chooser

  Copyright © 2007-2015 Wilson County News. All rights reserved. Web development by Drewa Designs.