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1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

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Lost & Found

Lost Bull registered Black Angus last seen Eagle Creek, Oakfields area, south of 775 July 20th. 214 freeze branded left hip & tattooed in ears. Green eartag.Larry Smith 210 557-9201
Lost July 4th male Chihuahua white with brown spots walks slow older dog went missing in Poth last seen walking down FM541 call 8304009851 if you seen him snowball
Found: Chihuahua and Dachshund near Floresville High School. Call 210-548-0356.
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Help Wanted

Seeking individual to work in a local child-care center, paid holidays, etc., must be high school grad or GED. Apply in person at Cubs Country Childcare, 212 FM 1346 in La Vernia.
ON-CALL CRISIS POOL WORKERS NEEDED. Part-time positions are available for after hours “on-call” crisis workers to respond to mental health crisis for Wilson and Karnes Counties. Duties include crisis interventions, assessments, referrals to stabilization services, and referrals for involuntary treatment services according to the Texas Mental Health Laws. You must have at least a Bachelor’s Degree in psychology, sociology, social work, nursing, etc. On-call hours are from 5 p.m.-8 a.m. weekdays, weekends and holidays vary. If selected, you must attend required training and must be able to report to designated safe sites within 1 hour of request for assessment. Compensation is at a rate of $200 per week plus $100 per completed and submitted crisis assessment, and mileage. If interested call Camino Real Community Services, 210-357-0359.
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Agriculture Today


Landscapes and butterflies




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South Texas Gardener
May 16, 2012 | 3,958 views | Post a comment

Q. What is the deal with all the butterflies? Is it the rain and lush weed crop that increased the population so quickly from one year to the next?

A. The warm weather and lush plant growth have resulted in a large number of butterflies in our landscapes especially if you have plants that they find desirable.

In a landscape with many flowers blooming it may be possible to identify as many as 30 different species.

To identify the many species, obtain a butterfly handbook. There are a number of good ones. Look for one that shows photos of the caterpillars in addition to the adults.

For more information on plants that attract butterflies, obtain “Butterfly Gardening for the South” by Gevata Ajilvsgi. In addition to plants, the book offers ideas on attracting butterflies with water, mud, overripe fruit, and sugar water.

Q. What is causing the lumpy appearance of my early Bicentennial peaches? The lumps seem to be scar tissue. Is it a disease? Are they ruined?

A. The symptoms you describe seem like stinkbug damage. The insects inject a digestive juice into the peach and then suck out the resultant “stew.” The texture of the tissue that remains is unpleasant but it is safe to eat.

It is too late to save your Bicentennial peaches from stinkbugs but later fruit may still turn out okay if it is sprayed every week with Sevin or Malathion.

Q. My snapdragons got a red powder on the leaves and almost immediately, the blooms declined. Is there something I should have done or can do?

A. No, the disease you describe is rust. When temperatures warm up, all snaps are susceptible. Pull them up, bury them in the compost pile, and replace them with zinnias, Cora vinca, or cosmos for the summer.

Q. Which of the southern peas works best here? I like to harvest them early and use them as snap beans. In East Texas, I liked purple hulls.

A. Purple hulls or black-eyed peas do fine here for the purposes you propose. Seed them anytime from now through June.

Q. Do tomatoes require cages? I never got around to it and now the plants are too large.

A. No, commercial growers do not use cages. The plants spread out and some of the fruit that sits on the ground may be prone to rot or insect attacks, but overall production may be just as good as plants grown with cages. I find the fruit easier to harvest and spray when I use cages.
 

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