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Lost & Found

Lost: Male Chihuahua, July 4, white with brown spots, walks slow, older dog, last seen walking down F.M. 541, Poth. Call 830-400-9851 if you seen Snowball.
Lost: White Maltese dog, 12 pounds, answers to Brookley, on Sun., July 19, 10 miles north of Floresville on Hwy. 181, $100 reward! Tom and Jean Harris, 830-393-0814. 
Found: Dachshund in Abrego Lake Estates, Floresville, on July 23. Call Tracy to describe, 830-477-7779.
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Help Wanted

Full-time diesel mechanic needed, CDL required. Applicants may apply online at www.stockdale.k12.tx.us or pick up application at the Stockdale ISD Administration Office. All openings are available until filled. Stockdale ISD is an equal opportunity employer. Stockdale ISD does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, handicap, or age in its employment practices.  830-996-3551.
The 81st & 218th Judicial District Community Supervision and Corrections Department (Adult Probation) is currently seeking qualified applicants for the position of Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor (LCDC). This is a full-time position that will require travel to the following counties: Atascosa, Frio, Karnes, LaSalle, and Wilson. Requirements: Must be licensed as a chemical dependency counselor through the Texas Department of State Health Services. Starting Salary: $33,705 (Associates Degree), $35,705 (Bachelor’s Degree), plus State benefits and mileage. Closing date: August 14, 2015. Procedure: Applicants should submit resume and license verification to: Renee Merten, Director, 1144 C Street, Floresville, TX 78114 OR via email rmerten@81-218cscd.org. For inquiries contact Renee Merten at 830-393-7317.
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Agriculture Today


Smuggled horses found to be diseased




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May 23, 2012 | 4,032 views | Post a comment

AUSTIN -- The U.S. Border Patrol agents recently seized 10 adult horses and four yearlings as they attempted to enter Texas illegally by walking across the Rio Grande River near Indian Hot Springs, in southern Hudspeth County, south of El Paso. According to a May 18 Texas Animal Health Commission press release, the animals were turned over to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Service officials, who tested the horses in Presidio, for a number of disease conditions that are considered foreign to the United States.

All 10 of the adult animals tested positive for Equine Piroplasmosis (EP). EP is routinely found in Mexico and numerous other countries around the world, but is not considered to be endemic to the United States. The blood borne protozoal disease can be fatal to horses and could create major constraints to interstate and international movements if left undetected. The disease does not affect humans.

According to Dr. Grant Wease, field veterinarian for the Ag Department’s Veterinary Service in El Paso, the illegal movement of animals is an ongoing concern in the vast open spaces of West Texas.

In some places the Rio Grande poses no barrier at all to foot traffic for man or animal. According to the latest USDA information, Wease indicated that “In 2011, approximately 280 head of cattle and 160 head of equine (primarily horses) were intercepted by USDA officials along the Rio Grande.” To further complicate the situation, many of the normal import process for livestock entering Texas have been impacted by border violence, making the attempt to smuggle animals into the state even more tempting.

The investigation by the USDA and Texas Animal Health Commission is ongoing to determine not only the source of the horses, but the possible destination as well. The Texas Animal Health Commission recently passed Equine Piroplasmosis rules requiring testing of race horses prior to entry into a Texas track, and numerous other states have done the same because of recent cases found in that population of horses.

“Racing Quarter horses with some connection to Mexico appear to be at highest risk of testing positive to the emerging disease,” Dr. Dee Ellis, State Veterinarian and Texas Animal Health Commission Executive Director said. Although the interdicted horses were described as Thoroughbreds, they were considered to be more likely breeding type animals rather than race ready horses.

“This situation highlights the ongoing border security problems Texas is facing, which leads to an increased risk of disease introduction for the Texas livestock population when animals enter our state illegally,” Ellis said. “I encourage all citizens that witness unusual activity regarding livestock movement near the Mexican border to contact their local law enforcement or animal health officials as quickly as possible to report the situation.”

The Texas Animal Health Commission strives to provide quality customer service to the citizens of Texas and works with its USDA partners daily to protect Texas livestock and poultry from foreign animal diseases. With limited state and federal resources however, the two agencies must continually review ongoing surveillance efforts along the border to ensure their actions are as effective as possible.

For more information contact the Texas Animal Health Commission at 1-800-550-8242 or visit www.tahc.state.tx.us.
 

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