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Lost & Found

Lost: Male Red Nose Pit Bull, "Chevy," wearing an orange collar, friendly, last seen on County Road 403. 830-477-6511 or 830-534-9094.

VideoREWARD. LOST CAT: Gray and white male cat, since Nov. 13, on C.R. 429, Stockdale, wearing a silver collar. Call 512-629-2005 with any information.
Bear, please come home! Missing since October 22, 2014, black Manx cat (no tail), shy. Reward! Help him find his way home. 210-635-7560.
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Cattle secretary needed for pre-conditioning yard. Experience preferred but not required. Please fax resume to 830-393-9510.
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Agriculture Today


State climatologist: East Texas in surprisingly good condition




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Robert Burns
July 3, 2012 | 4,303 views | Post a comment

What’s surprising in early May is not that West Texas is so dry, but that the eastern half of the state is in relatively good condition, said Dr. John Nielsen-Gammon, state climatologist and regents professor at Texas A&M University in a May 8 press release.

“The thing that was unexpected was having East Texas not be in an extreme drought right now,” Nielsen-Gammon said. “We had a second year of La Niña last winter. It just finally ended officially last month. And normally -- four years out of five -- you end up with a dry winter. So things have worked out as well as possibly can be expected for East Texas.”

Unfortunately, West Texas is doing “as expected,” and is in the second year of major drought, Nielsen-Gammon said.

Reports from Texas AgriLife Extension Service county agents tell just how dire the situation is in parts of West Texas.

The weekly comments of Ryan Martin, AgriLife Extension agent for Motley County, southeast of Amarillo, are representative of many county agents’ reports coming from West Texas. Motley County hasn’t received any rainfall for several weeks, and hot, dry winds have prevailed.

“Summer grasses are trying to come out, but without any moisture, they have just stalled,” Martin said. “At this time there is no moisture to 24 inches deep. Farmers are beginning to get worried as planting season is right around the corner, and there is no soil moisture. Right now it seems like déjà vu with the high winds, high temperatures, and no moisture.”

Higher-than-normal temperatures -- in some cases as much as 15 degrees above average -- are compounding the drought in West Texas, Neilsen-Gammon said.

“Random effects” of the jet stream are partly to blame for the higher-than-normal temperatures, and about 1 degree can be attributed to global warming,” he said. But a large portion of the higher temperatures are caused by the dry soils. Dry soils mean there isn’t any moisture to evaporate and cool things off.

“There’s been enough rain in East Texas to keep temperatures down to near normal this summer,” he said. “I wish I could say the same for West Texas.”

If there’s any other good news, it’s that North Atlantic Ocean sea-surface temperatures are near normal, Neilsen-Gammon said.

“For Texas, that would seem to indicate that we might be getting more rainfall (this summer) than we have for the past several years.”

Robert Burns has nearly 30 years’ experience writing about agriculture and agricultural-related research. He writes about Texas AgriLife Research and Texas AgriLife Extension Service activities at the Overton Center and centers in Stephenville and Temple.
 

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