Saturday, December 20, 2014
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

WCN Site Search


Lost & Found

Found: Great Pyrenees in La Vernia. Call or text to claim 830-581-8041.

VideoMissing: Kitten from Eagle Creek Subdivision, 9-month-old female, answers to "Sassy," 4-year-old daughter is heartbroken and we greatly miss her. 985-414-8385.
Lost: Pit Bull, red/white female, off 319 and Hidden Deer in La Vernia, no collar, sores on front legs from allergies. 210-310-4458.
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

*Fair Housing notice. All help wanted advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference limitation or discrimination." This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for help wanted ads, which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
The 81st & 218th Judicial District Community Supervision and Corrections Department (Adult Probation) is seeking qualified applicants for the position of Supervision Officer for Atascosa County. Requirements: A Bachelor’s degree recognized by the Texas Higher Education Coordination Board in Criminology, Corrections, Criminal Justice, Law Enforcement/Police Science, Counseling, Pre-Law, Social Work, Psychology, Sociology, Human Services Development, Public Administration, or a related field that has been approved by the Community Justice Assistance Division (CJAD), or one year of graduate study in one of the above mentioned fields, or one year experience in full-time casework, counseling, or community or group work that has been approved by CJAD. This position requires some evening and/or weekend work. Salary: Negotiable, plus regular State benefits. Closing Date: Resumes will be taken until December 30, 2014. Procedure: Applicants should submit a typed resume and copy of college transcript to: Renee Merten, Interim Director, 1144 C Street, Floresville, TX  78114. The 81st & 218th Judicial District Community Supervision and Corrections Department is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos





Video Vault ›

Commentaries


Patterson drilling down for answer to Texas water crisis




E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story

Disclaimer:
The author of this entry is responsible for this content, which is not edited by the Wilson County News or wilsoncountynews.com.
July 9, 2012 | 2,519 views | 1 comment

State set to invest in purifying brackish water for commercial sale in Central Texas

AUSTIN -- Along Interstate 35, between Austin and San Antonio, the Texas Economic Miracle is thirsting for water. Tight restrictions on the Edwards Aquifer and the high costs of pipelines are choking off the potential growth of homes and businesses.

But on one 2,000-acre tract of land north of New Braunfels -- still parched from last year’s drought -- Texas Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson hopes he’s found the water needed to help end Central Texas’ water crisis.

As chairman of the School Land Board, which manages the real estate portfolio of the state’s $26 billion Permanent School Fund, Patterson is investigating the feasibility of tapping into Texas’ abundant brackish groundwater, desalinating it, and selling it.

“We don’t need to live one step away from crisis and drought,” Patterson said. “Texas may be short on water, but not innovation. Desal is part of Texas’ water future and we’re going to start right here.”

Patterson said the General Land Office has contracted with experts to study the hydrology and geology of several Permanent School Fund tracts of land along the I-35 corridor. “If the water is there, then I think the School Land Board is ready to invest the time and resources needed to deliver an entirely new and drought-resistant source of water for Central Texas,” Patterson said. “This is a game-changer, a commonsense fix for the Texas water crisis.”

The impact of developing a new source of water in Central Texas will be seen all the way downstream, Patterson said, potentially benefiting rice farmers, petrochemical facilities, utilities and even the health of the state’s bays and estuaries. “Adding desal to the mix would help mitigate the impact of a drought on the Highland Lakes,” Patterson said. “Desal in Central Texas would help all the way to the coast.”

Patterson said he hopes to develop a groundwater desalination model that could be replicated on other state-owned tracts of land all over Texas. “Texas has an abundance of brackish water,” Patterson said. “I hope to put the General Land Office in the water business statewide.”

The coming Texas water crisis was highlighted in this month’s Texas Monthly, which points out the importance of finding solutions now, before the state’s population doubles in the next 50 years.

After all, Patterson said, necessity really is the mother of invention. “We can’t plan on taking any more fresh water from the Edwards Aquifer. It takes 30 years to get a new lake permitted and filled. Pipelines cost a fortune,” Patterson said. “If we want to keep growing, we need water and I think desal is a common-sense part of that solution.”
 
« Previous Blog Entry (July 9, 2012)
 


Your Opinions and Comments

 
Elaine K.  
Floresville  
July 9, 2012 1:51pm
 
 
New post.
 

Share your comment or opinion on this story!


You must be logged in to post comments:



Other Commentaries

Commentaries
Commentaries page govtrack.us
Commentaries who represents me?
Chester WilsonVoncille Bielefeld homeEast Central Driving SchoolAllstate & McBride RealtyBlue Moon Karaoke & DJTriple R DC ExpertsHeavenly Touch home

  Copyright © 2007-2014 Wilson County News. All rights reserved. Web development by Drewa Designs.