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LOOKING TO FIND:Jacob Sanchez My beloved son. He can get in touch:Alberto Carvajal 786 350 8436 carvajalalberto@yahoo.com www.facebook.com/alberto.carvajal.585 ALBERTO CARVAJAL MIAMI, FL
Lost: White Maltese dog, 12 pounds, answers to Brookley, on Sun., July 19, 10 miles north of Floresville on Hwy. 181, $100 reward! Tom and Jean Harris, 830-393-0814. 
Lost Bull registered Black Angus last seen Eagle Creek, Oakfields area, south of 775 July 20th. 214 freeze branded left hip & tattooed in ears. Green eartag.Larry Smith 210 557-9201
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F&W Electrical is now hiring journeyman, backhoe operators, and laborers. Apply at 6880 U.S. Hwy. 181 N., Floresville, Monday-Friday, 8-5. 830-393-0083. EOE.
Himmel Home Health is hiring RN / LVN to conduct private duty nursing and skilled nursing visits w/children ages birth to 20. Elmendorf area: Sat & Sun 7am-7pm;7pm-7am. Sign-on bonus! Texas Board of Nursing license required. Send resume to careers@himmelhomehealth.com.
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Agriculture Today


Grasshopper problems likely to get worse




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Robert Burns
August 1, 2012 | 3,688 views | Post a comment

COLLEGE STATION -- If you’ve got grasshopper problems now, you’re probably going to continue to have them until this fall, said a Texas AgriLife Extension Service entomologist.

Grasshoppers are long-lived; they’re with us most of the summer, and growers are still battling them, said Dr. Allen Knutson, AgriLife Extension entomologist, Dallas.

Some producers have already had to re-treat two or three times to protect crops, Knutson said.

And because grasshoppers thrive in hot weather, the problems they pose to crops will likely get worse before they get better, he said.

“As we get into the hot, dry summer, more and more of their wild host plants --- weeds and wild grasses -- dry up, and that forces them into our crops, especially irrigated fields,” he said.

High grasshopper populations are tied to drought for a number of reasons, according to Knutson. The first grasshopper hatch was earlier than normal because spring warmed up sooner than normal. And because many areas had a dry winter, a fungus, Entomophthora grylli, that usually causes high grasshopper mortality was not as prevalent in many areas.

He noted that if producers in a particular area didn’t have an early grasshopper population boom, they’re unlikely to see one later in the summer. Though grasshoppers live two months or after they reach the adult stage, they are homebodies, rarely traveling more than a few miles from where they were hatched.

Robert Burns has nearly 30 years’ experience writing about agriculture and agricultural-related research. He writes about Texas AgriLife Research and Texas AgriLife Extension Service activities at the Overton Center and centers in Stephenville and Temple.
 

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