Thursday, February 11, 2016
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Lost & Found

Bear, please come home! Missing since October 22, 2014, black Manx cat (no tail), shy. Reward! Help him find his way home. 210-635-7560.
Lost: Female German Shepherd, about 2 years old, pink collar, lost from Hickory Hill/Great Oaks Subdivisions off FM 539, La Vernia, on Thurs., Feb. 4. Reward! 830-947-3465.
Found: Basset Hound, Hwy. 97 W./Hospital Blvd., Floresville. Call 830-391-2153 between 9 a.m.-11:30 p.m.
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Help Wanted

Although we make every effort to spot suspicious ads before they run, one may occasionally get into print. If that happens, we ask the consumer to call us ASAP so that we can take corrective action.
Immanuel Lutheran Church is now hiring for a Youth and Family Ministry Director. Pastoral: Minister to youth and their families during Sunday School and other church programs, being present in their lives outside the church walls, available for common concerns and in crisis situations. Leadership: Recruit and nurture Youth and Family Ministry program. Administration : Manage the planning process and coordinate with Pastor and Youth Committee all regular ministries to youth and their families. This includes youth of all ages on Sunday mornings and mid-week events; assisting with Confirmation, special events, trips and retreats, and parent meetings. Stewardship: Ongoing evaluation of the effectiveness of youth programs, manage youth ministry budget, and collaborate with the sponsors of each Youth group. Ability to build, lead, and empower youth. Ability to implement a ministry vision. Familiarity with Lutheran Doctrine required; must be comfortable teaching it and representing Lutheran Theology. Proficient computer skills using MS Word, Excel, PowerPoint, database, email, internet, and social media. Supervisory experience preferred. Ability to adapt and evaluate curriculum preferred. Must have excellent organization, communication (verbal and written), and listening skills, with a high degree of initiative and accountability. Exceptional interpersonal and relational skills required, with sensitivity to church members and visitors. Understanding and enjoyment of youth and families and guiding their spiritual development. Please send resumes to immanuellavernia@gmail.com or call 830-253-8121.
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The 411: Youth


Is your child’s backpack too heavy?




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September 19, 2012 | 978 views | Post a comment

While backpacks are a convenient and sometimes stylish way to carry books for most young students, parents need to be aware of the risks they pose.

According to Connally Memorial Rehabilitation, wearing backpacks improperly or packs that are too heavy put children at increased risk for musculoskeletal injuries. “A student can incur injury when he or she tries to adapt to a heavy load and uses bad postures such as arching the back, bending forward, twisting, or leaning,” explained Sue Rabidou, administrator with Warm Springs/CMMC Rehabilitation. “These varied postures can result in improper spinal alignment and this can inhibit shock absorption of the disks in the spine.”

Rabidou and CMMC Rehabilitation recommend some tips for your child as they head off to school this fall:

Wear both straps. Using only one strap causes one side of the body to bear the majority of the weight of the backpack. When wearing two shoulder straps, the weight of the pack is distributed evenly and better posture is promoted.

Put on and remove backpacks carefully. Do not twist to remove backpack and keep trunk stable. Wear the backpack over the strongest back muscles. Backpacks should rest evenly in the middle of the back near the children’s center of gravity. Do not let the pack extend below the low back.

Lighten the load. Although students are busy with classes and extracurricular activities and carry the associated materials, it is important to strive not to carry more than 10 to 15 percent of the child’s body weight.

Encourage physical activity. Students who are more active tend to have better muscle flexibility and strength, making it easier to carry a backpack.

This article is courtesy of Connally Memorial Medical Center. Reprinted with permission.
 

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