Thursday, April 28, 2016
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

WCN Site Search


Preview the Paper Preview the Paper

Preview this week's Paper
A limited number of pages are displayed in this preview.
Preview this Week’s Issue ›
Subscribe Today ›

Lost & Found

Lost: Border Collie, black and white male, one eye, microchipped, C.R. 319/F.M. 775 area. 210-382-2167.

VideoREWARD!! Trooper a gray & white male cat is missing from County Road 429 Stockdale. He might have been accidently transported off. Missing since 11/13/2015. Call 512-629-2005.
*Includes FREE photo online! mywcn.com/lostandfound
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

*Fair Housing notice. All help wanted advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference limitation or discrimination." This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for help wanted ads, which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
Full-time bartender needed at Olmos Country Corner Store, 9071 FM 467. Call Rick at 210-687-0108.
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos





Video Vault ›
You’ve been granted free access to this subscribers only article.

The 411: Youth


Is your child’s backpack too heavy?




E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story
Contributed
September 19, 2012 | 993 views | Post a comment

While backpacks are a convenient and sometimes stylish way to carry books for most young students, parents need to be aware of the risks they pose.

According to Connally Memorial Rehabilitation, wearing backpacks improperly or packs that are too heavy put children at increased risk for musculoskeletal injuries. “A student can incur injury when he or she tries to adapt to a heavy load and uses bad postures such as arching the back, bending forward, twisting, or leaning,” explained Sue Rabidou, administrator with Warm Springs/CMMC Rehabilitation. “These varied postures can result in improper spinal alignment and this can inhibit shock absorption of the disks in the spine.”

Rabidou and CMMC Rehabilitation recommend some tips for your child as they head off to school this fall:

Wear both straps. Using only one strap causes one side of the body to bear the majority of the weight of the backpack. When wearing two shoulder straps, the weight of the pack is distributed evenly and better posture is promoted.

Put on and remove backpacks carefully. Do not twist to remove backpack and keep trunk stable. Wear the backpack over the strongest back muscles. Backpacks should rest evenly in the middle of the back near the children’s center of gravity. Do not let the pack extend below the low back.

Lighten the load. Although students are busy with classes and extracurricular activities and carry the associated materials, it is important to strive not to carry more than 10 to 15 percent of the child’s body weight.

Encourage physical activity. Students who are more active tend to have better muscle flexibility and strength, making it easier to carry a backpack.

This article is courtesy of Connally Memorial Medical Center. Reprinted with permission.
 

Your Opinions and Comments


Be the first to comment on this story!


You must be logged in to post a comment.




Not a subscriber?
Subscriber, but no password?
Forgot password?

The 411: Youth Archives


NIE school
Allstate & McBride RealtyTriple R DC ExpertsEast Central Driving SchoolHeavenly Touch homeVoncille Bielefeld home

  Copyright © 2007-2016 Wilson County News. All rights reserved. Web development by Drewa Designs.