Friday, September 4, 2015
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

WCN Site Search


Lost & Found


VideoLost: Shih Tzu, male, golden brown, from C.R. 320 in Floresville. If you have any information call 210-452-1829 or 832-292-3305.

VideoFound: Male dog in Eagle Creek, with collar no tags, clean and healthy, very friendly, non aggressive. Call if he's yours, 210-844-1951. 

VideoBoxer mix found with red collar in Floresville. Good with kids and other dogs. Very obedient. If owner doesnt respond in the next week he is free to good home.
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

Plastic Product Formers, Inc. is accepting applications for a full-time blow-mold operator. Must be willing to perform physical work in an outside environment and work 10-12 hour shifts including overtime. Must be willing to work some weekend and night shifts. Will be required to clean, set-up, operate, and monitor blow-mold equipment while also performing trimming and inspection of production parts. Includes packaging and material handling. Must pass background check and drug test. Excellent benefits offered. Fax 210-635-7999 or apply in person at 7124 Richter Road, Elmendorf, TX.
Help wanted, skills needed: cement, plasterer, welder, fence construction. Call 210-771-5255.
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos





Video Vault ›
You’ve been granted free access to this subscribers only article.

The 411: Youth


Is your child’s backpack too heavy?




E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story
Contributed
September 19, 2012 | 909 views | Post a comment

While backpacks are a convenient and sometimes stylish way to carry books for most young students, parents need to be aware of the risks they pose.

According to Connally Memorial Rehabilitation, wearing backpacks improperly or packs that are too heavy put children at increased risk for musculoskeletal injuries. “A student can incur injury when he or she tries to adapt to a heavy load and uses bad postures such as arching the back, bending forward, twisting, or leaning,” explained Sue Rabidou, administrator with Warm Springs/CMMC Rehabilitation. “These varied postures can result in improper spinal alignment and this can inhibit shock absorption of the disks in the spine.”

Rabidou and CMMC Rehabilitation recommend some tips for your child as they head off to school this fall:

Wear both straps. Using only one strap causes one side of the body to bear the majority of the weight of the backpack. When wearing two shoulder straps, the weight of the pack is distributed evenly and better posture is promoted.

Put on and remove backpacks carefully. Do not twist to remove backpack and keep trunk stable. Wear the backpack over the strongest back muscles. Backpacks should rest evenly in the middle of the back near the children’s center of gravity. Do not let the pack extend below the low back.

Lighten the load. Although students are busy with classes and extracurricular activities and carry the associated materials, it is important to strive not to carry more than 10 to 15 percent of the child’s body weight.

Encourage physical activity. Students who are more active tend to have better muscle flexibility and strength, making it easier to carry a backpack.

This article is courtesy of Connally Memorial Medical Center. Reprinted with permission.
 

Your Opinions and Comments


Be the first to comment on this story!


You must be logged in to post a comment.




Not a subscriber?
Subscriber, but no password?
Forgot password?

The 411: Youth Archives


NIE school
Heavenly Touch homeVoncille Bielefeld homeauto chooserDrama KidsTriple R DC ExpertsAllstate & McBride Realty

  Copyright © 2007-2015 Wilson County News. All rights reserved. Web development by Drewa Designs.