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Floresville ISD is accepting applications for the position of Carpenter: Must have various construction trades with a minimum of 3 years’ experience. Applications must be submitted on line at www.FISD.us.
The 81st Judicial District Attorney’s office is seeking candidates for the position of an Administrative Assistant. Duties will include but not limited to: answering incoming calls and greeting visitors, prepare discovery for defense bar as required, providing administrative and clerical support to the ADAs and District Attorney, assist in general office work and perform related duties as follows: Operate a multi-line telephone switchboard, proficient use of software applications and computer equipment, scanning and compiling files for eDiscovery, filing and creating court files, generating reports as required. Applicants must have at least five (5) years of administrative assistant experience, strong computer skills (Word, Excel, PowerPoint) ability to multi-task, excellent organizational skills and attention to detail. Some heavy lifting (about 40 pounds) required. Please mail, fax or email resumes and cover letters to the address and email below. DEADLINE FOR RESUME SUBMISSION IS MAY 6, 2016 AT 5 P.M. District Attorney Rene Pena, C/O Teri Reyes, Office Manager, 1327 THIRD STREET, FLORESVILLE, TEXAS 78114. Fax 830-393-2205. terireyes@81stda.org.
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Where’s the Outcry Over TV News Censorship, Ex-NBC Exec Asks?




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The author of this entry is responsible for this content, which is not edited by the Wilson County News or wilsoncountynews.com.
September 20, 2012 | 2,075 views | 3 comments

By Corydon B. Dunham

While recent protests over proposed legislation addressing media entertainment piracy were loud and widespread, a veteran TV executive says the public seems unaware of an even greater threat to our free speech and a free press.

“People voiced concern about whether SOPA and PIPA (the House and Senate piracy bills) would limit free speech on the Internet. But the resurrection of television’s old Fairness Doctrine, so government could again edit and censor news is a far more ominous threat,” says Corydon B. Dunham, former 25-year NBC-TV executive and author of Government Control of News: A Constitutional Challenge.

“The Federal Communications Commission has drafted a new policy for government control of news. And even though a special study last year recommended that such a censorship policy be scrapped, it’s still pending, with the potential for action. Frankly, I’m surprised there is no outcry or debate about this political threat to distort news and speech and suppress them.”

The FCC’s proposed new Localism, Balance and Diversity Doctrine mirrors many aspects of the long-dead Fairness Doctrine, he says. That doctrine was revoked in 1987 when the FCC and the courts found that it had suppressed news, chilled speech, imposed censorship, prevented criticism of the administration then in office, and created an atmosphere of “timidity and fear.”

“The new localism doctrine is very similar.” Dunham says. “It would force television stations to provide government ‘localism’ in news production and coverage -- as well as revise news reports to comply with government dictates on news balance and viewpoint diversity. Failure to comply could mean loss of the station license to broadcast.

“It may sound good to some people, but in the past, government investigations and regulation enforcement deterred news broadcasts about public and political issues. to keep their broadcast licenses, stations had to conform their news and political reports to what they believed FCC commissioners would approve or revise news reports to what the commissioners did approve.

“The FCC itself finally revoked that doctrine as against the public interest. Since the FCC is planning to transfer to the internet the broadcast spectrum now used by local TV, news websites ultimately could fall under the new Internet rules.”

Here are some highlights of the old doctrine and the new one:

• The Fairness Doctrine ruled TV news broadcasters from 1949 to 1987. Believing that the communication power of this, at the time, new medium concentrated great power in few hands, the government mandated that broadcast stations provide what the FCC would decide and dictate as appropriate “contrasting view” coverage.

• Under the Localism Doctrine, enforcement would not only be the job of the FCC, but also of a local board added at each station to monitor programming, including news. the members of that board would be required to recommend against a station’s license renewal if they thought station programming news was not complying with this new FCC policy on localism, balance and diversity.


• Under localism rules, a three-vote majority of five politically appointed FCC commissioners at a central government agency would make local news judgments. They would override independent, local TV reporters and editors to impose government agency views on what should be reported and how.

“This new policy, if activated, would directly target news and speech on television and enable an administration to use news coverage to manipulate and influence public opinion about important public and political issues,” Dunham says. “The effect would inevitably be something quite different from independent news.”

That isn’t speculation, Dunham notes. It’s history.

Corydon B. Dunham is a Harvard Law School graduate. His Government Control of News study was initiated at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Smithsonian Institute, and expanded and developed for the Corydon B. Dunham Fellowship for the First Amendment at Harvard Law School and the Dunham Open Forum for First Amendment Values at Bowdoin College. Dunham was an executive at NBC from 1965 to 1990. He oversaw legal and government matters and broadcast standards. He was on the board of directors of the National Television Academy of Arts and Sciences, American Corporate Counsel Association, and American Arbitration Association among other posts.
 
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Your Opinions and Comments

 
Facts only please  
TX  
September 21, 2012 11:11am
 
Serious Thinker: We (USA) are already a Social Country! This article is a non-starter, just another attempt by WCN to stir up trouble.

 
The Marcelina Muse  
Dry Tank, TX  
September 21, 2012 10:13am
 
"enable an administration to use news coverage to manipulate and influence public opinion about public and political issues". Isn't that exactly what the major media is doing to protect the Obama administration right ... More ›

 
Serious Thinker  
La Vernia  
September 20, 2012 9:34pm
 
Hope Gov Romney has a landslide Victory....if not Welcome to Socialism USA! Americans need to vote with their brains on this on and not trymto be "politically or socially" correct when voting. King Obama is ... More ›

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