Friday, July 3, 2015
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

WCN Site Search


Lost & Found


VideoPlease help my toy Aussie get home..181 & 1604 area. She's an adult,13" & less than 20 pounds. Please call if you see or find her. 210-328-5050
Our beloved Gracie is missing since October, Dachshund/Lab mix, microchipped, about 30 pounds, black with little white. $1000 reward for safe return. Call with any information, 830-393-9999 or 419-250-9099.

VideoFound female med sized dog on Hickory Hill Dr in LaVernia. Pic in WCNews online ad. Probably not neutered, very playful and gets along well with cats. Please call 830-947-3458
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

Live at no charge in upscale apartment as companion for man with autism and intellectual disability, south/downtown San Antonio, foster care through Medicaid Waiver Program, couples may apply, IRS okays wages, nontaxable, background check required. Send resume to mmoyer@satx.rr.com or text for more information 210-382-6369.
Help wanted, skills needed: cement, plasterer, welder, fence construction. Call 210-771-5255.
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos





Video Vault ›

Agriculture Today


October 2012 Gardening Calendar




E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story

October 1, 2012 | 3,216 views | Post a comment

This is an occasional column available to all users. Watch for Calvin Finch's weekly column, South Texas Gardener, every week in the Wilson County News. Subscribe today! https://wilsoncountynews.com/subscribe-today.php?

It is time to plant broccoli, cabbage, kale, collards, chard, cauliflower, and Brussels sprout transplants in the garden. You can plant mustard, lettuce, radishes, rutabagas, turnips, beets and carrots by seed.

My favorite greens are beets, collards and chard. Beets do not provide as much production as collards or chard, but if you plant them thick, you can harvest the extra plants that are thinned out. Collards, chard, lettuce, kale, turnips and mustard can be harvested leaf by leaf as you need them all winter. As long as two-thirds of the leaf surface remains, the plant will replace the harvested leaves.

Bright Lights Swiss Chard has a special attraction; its stems are yellow, pink, orange, red and green, making a showy ornamental in addition to nutritious greens. In my experience, Swiss chard is also the longest lasting green into the summer. June-harvested chard can still be palatable.

Hold off planting spinach transplants until next month.

Keep your tomatoes, green beans, peppers, summer squash and sweet corn well watered and fertilized. A cup of slow-release or winterizer lawn fertilizer spread along an 8 foot row every 3 weeks will do the job. Also, continue your seaweed-extract and neem-oil sprays on your tomatoes to slow down the development of spider mite populations.

In the flower garden, it is time to plant snapdragons, stocks, dianthus, calendulas, ornamental kale and ornamental cabbage transplants. The tough petunias such as Wave, VIP and Laura Bush will also work. If the zinnia, marigolds and vinca in the flower garden are still attractive, it will be a tough decision about replacing them. They will continue to look good as long as the weather stays mild.

One option is to remove half of the hot-weather flowers to make room for some of the cool-weather plants. The winter annuals perform better through the winter if they are planted now. The exceptions are cyclomen, pansies and primula. Wait until November to plant them.

October is the lawn fertilization month. As close to the first as possible, apply a winterizer fertilizer such as 15-5-15. The winterizer application does not translate into growth that you will have to mow, but it is important for cold resistance in the winter and for fast green-up in the spring.

Early autumn is the best time to plant shade trees and new shrubs. The root system has time to develop before the plant faces the challenge of a hot summer. Consider live oak, Texas red oak, Mexican white oak, cedar elm, Mexican sycamore, chinkapin oak or Chinese pistache. Among the best shrubs for shade are viburnum, standard pittosporum, Buford holly, dwarf Chinese holly, nandina and dwarf yaupon holly. Hollies, nandinas, Texas mountain laurel and pomegranate are good for planting in the sun. Also consider the modern tough roses such as Carefree Beauty (Katy Road), Knockout and Belinda’s Dream, as well as the old-fashioned roses like Martha Gonzales, Mrs. Dudley Cross and butterfly rose. They are great additions to the sunny part of the landscape.

Selection may be limited in the fall, but there are often good sales at area nurseries.

Don’t forget to plant wildflower seeds to areas in full sun where the weed cover is gone because of thin soils and dry weather. The seed will germinate as long as it reaches the soil in full sun. The soil does not need to be prepared.

Calvin R. Finch, Ph.D. is a Horticulturist and Director with the Texas A&M Water Conservation and Technology Center.
 

Your Opinions and Comments


Be the first to comment on this story!


You must be logged in to post a comment.




Not a subscriber?
Subscriber, but no password?
Forgot password?

Agriculture Today Archives


Coupons ag-right
Allstate & McBride RealtyTriple R DC ExpertsDrama Kidsauto chooserHeavenly Touch homeVoncille Bielefeld home

  Copyright © 2007-2015 Wilson County News. All rights reserved. Web development by Drewa Designs.