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The 411: Youth


Future leaders restore farm back to South Texas prairie


Future leaders restore farm back to South Texas prairie
Cub Scout Pack 22 and Freedom Riders 4-H member Tanner White (left) and Zoe Rutledge of the Freedom Riders 4-H Club measure the distance before planting the next native plant.


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October 31, 2012
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As part of the fourth annual one day 4-H, held in conjunction with National 4-H Week, six Wilson County 4-H clubs joined various Girl, Cub, and Boy Scout groups for a conservation project at the Kirchoff Family Farm on C.R. 201 in Dewees.

Among the 99 youth and adults joining the 4-H members to assist were one Girl Scout Troop from Wilson County, three Cub Scout Packs from Wilson and Atascosa counties; and five Boy Scout Troops from Wilson, Atascosa, and Karnes counties.

The Scouts and 4-H members planted 2,589 native, drought-tolerant trees and shrubs in an area covering 92,000 square feet as a firebreak. This first step in restoring the 200-acre farm back to a South Texas prairie was conducted Oct. 13-14. The trees also serve as an attractor for pollinating insects and birds, and provide safety and shelter to countless birds, insects, reptiles, and small mammals.

The project was a part of a U.S. Fish and Wildlife-funded program.
 

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