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Lost & Found

Lost: Border Collie, black and light brown, 9 months old, wearing a green collar, last seen Sept. 22 near CR 427 in Poth. If found call 210-324-1208.
*Includes FREE photo online!

VideoMissing 9/26/15 about 10pm. male chihuahuah black, gray and white, his name is Spy. possible ares he might be off 775 around Vintage Oaks Subdivision and Woodlands area. 830-391-5055.
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Help Wanted

ON-CALL CRISIS POOL WORKERS NEEDED. Part-time positions are available for after hours “on-call” crisis workers to respond to mental health crisis for Wilson and Karnes Counties. Duties include crisis interventions, assessments, referrals to stabilization services, and referrals for involuntary treatment services according to the Texas Mental Health Laws. You must have at least a Bachelor’s Degree in psychology, sociology, social work, nursing, etc. On-call hours are from 5 p.m.-8 a.m. weekdays, weekends and holidays vary. If selected, you must attend required training and must be able to report to designated safe sites within 1 hour of request for assessment. Compensation is at a rate of $200 per week plus $100 per completed and submitted crisis assessment, and mileage. If interested call Camino Real Community Services, 210-357-0359.
Be skeptical of ads that say you can make lots of money working from the comfort of your home. If this were true, wouldn’t we all be working at home?
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Breaking News

The Texas Traffic Series-12: Firsthand Account With Craig Teplicek, South Texas Rancher

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Todd Staples
Texas Department of Agriculture
November 6, 2012, 3:00pm
1,823 views | 1 comment

AUSTIN--In an ongoing effort to seek increased federal resources to enhance border security, Agriculture Commissioner Todd Staples today announced the twelfth video posting in a 16-part series titled “Texas Traffic -- True Stories of Drug and Human Smuggling.” The series is available at

This week’s video features Craig Teplicek, a South Texas rancher who sees drug and human smugglers, or “coyotes,” crossing his property on a regular basis. In a move that is highly discouraged by law enforcement, Teplicek once took matters into his own hands.

“The coyote was trying to get into the brush, so I ran and tackled him, and held him down until agents got there,” Teplicek said. “I know we are putting ourselves in danger, but I am to a point, I am fed up and we’ve got to do something.”

Each week for 16 weeks, the Texas Department of Agriculture is releasing videotaped interviews with law enforcement agents, farmers, ranchers and other citizens. These “Texas Traffic” stories offer firsthand accounts of drug running, human trafficking, international trespassing and other criminal activities linked to dangerous Mexican drug cartels.

“The Mexican drug cartels are violent, they are relentless in accessing the American drug market and they have chosen Texas as their primary access point,” Commissioner Staples said. “Unfortunately, President Obama and his staff continue to make jokes about the situation and suggest our border is safer than ever. The ‘Texas Traffic’ testimonials prove cartel activity is here on the U.S. side of the border.”

For the latest border news and to view each new episode of the “Texas Traffic” series, visit


Your Opinions and Comments

The Marcelina Muse  
Dry Tank, TX  
November 7, 2012 9:33am
With Obama re-elected you can expect even less help. We are on our own.

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