Friday, August 28, 2015
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

WCN Site Search


Lost & Found

Lost: Small black and white tortoise shell cat, 1-1/2 years old, since Aug. 8, Country Hills area, La Vernia, very friendly, "Cinnamon" but responds more to "Kitty," rhinestone collar with bell, shots and spayed, family loves and misses her terribly. Reward! 210-725-8082.

VideoStill missing long hair chihuahua. Near 3rd and 97 please if you see her she is very missed. Call jeri 409-781-3191
*Includes FREE photo online! mywcn.com/lostandfound
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

Plastic Product Formers, Inc. is accepting applications for a full-time blow-mold operator. Must be willing to perform physical work in an outside environment and work 10-12 hour shifts including overtime. Must be willing to work some weekend and night shifts. Will be required to clean, set-up, operate, and monitor blow-mold equipment while also performing trimming and inspection of production parts. Includes packaging and material handling. Must pass background check and drug test. Excellent benefits offered. Fax 210-635-7999 or apply in person at 7124 Richter Road, Elmendorf, TX.
First Lutheran Church in Floresville is seeking a Director of Youth and Family Ministry, part-time 20 hours/week. Qualifications: Have active worship life and ongoing growth in faith, understanding of Lutheran-Christian tradition, ability to work with both adults and youth, basic computer and organizational skills. Director will disciple both parents and youth grades 1-12, establish appropriate caring relationships with youth, seek opportunities to connect with youth in their environment on their schedule, organize parents into groups for children's ministry work, arrange at least 3 annual local events or trips for Sr. high youth, recruit and encourage youth and adults to take positions of shared leadership and involvement, create and implement means for regular communication with parents and youth, manage youth and family ministry calendar in collaboration with staff, parents, and youth. Applications accepted thru Sept. 15. To apply call 830-393-2747.
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos





Video Vault ›

Savvy Senior


Save money by donating your body to science




E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story

Disclaimer:
Jim Miller is responsible for this content, which is not edited by the Wilson County News or wilsoncountynews.com.
Jim Miller
November 21, 2012 | 1,076 views | Post a comment

Dear Savvy Senior,

What can you tell me about body donations? With little money to spare, I’m looking for a cheap way to die and have heard that donating my body to science is free, not to mention it benefits medical research.

Old and Poor

Dear Old,

If you’re looking to eliminate your final farewell expense and help advance medical research, donating your body to science is a great option to consider. Here’s what you should know.

Body Donations

Each year, an estimated 10,000 to 15,000 Americans donate their whole body, after death, to medical facilities throughout the country to be used in medical research projects, anatomy lessons, and surgical practice.

After using your body, these facilities will then provide free cremation -- which typically costs $600 to $3,000 -- and will either bury or scatter your ashes in a local cemetery or return them to your family, usually within a year or two.

Here are a few other tidbits you need to know to help you decide on whether whole-body donation is right for you.

•Organ donors excluded: Most programs require that you donate your whole body in its entirety. So if you want to be an organ donor, you won’t qualify to be a whole body donor too. You’ll have to choose.

•Not all bodies are accepted: If, for example, your body has been badly damaged in a care accident or if you’re morbidly obese, you many not qualify.

•Body transporting is covered: Most programs will pay to transport your body to their facility unless your body must be moved from out of state.

•No special requests: Most programs won’t allow you to donate your body for a specific purpose -- you give them the body and they decide how to use it.

•Funeral services are not covered: Most programs will allow your family to conduct any final services they wish before taking custody of your body, but they won’t pay for it.

•Your family won’t be paid: Federal law prohibits buying bodies.

What To Do

If you do decide you want to donate your body, it’s best to make arrangements in advance with a body donation program in your area. Most programs are offered by university-affiliated medical schools. To find one near you, the University of Florida maintains a list of U.S. programs and their contact information at www.med.ufl.edu/anatbd/usprograms.html.

In addition to the medical schools, there are also a number of private organizations like Anatomy Gifts Registry (anatomicgift.com), BioGift (biogift.org), and Science Care (sciencecare.com) that accept whole body donations too.

If you don’t have Internet access, you can get help over the phone by calling the National Family Services Desk, which operates a free body donation referral service during business hours at 1-800-727-0700.

Once you locate a program in your area, call and ask them to mail you an information/registration packet that will explain exactly how their program works.

To sign up, you’ll simply need to fill out a couple of forms. But, you can always change your mind by revoking your authorization in writing.

After you have made arrangements, you then need to tell your family members so they will know what to do and who to contact after your death. It’s also a good idea to tell your doctor and put your wishes in writing in your advance directives. These are legal documents that include a medical power of attorney and living will that spell out your wishes regarding your end-of-life medical treatment when you can no longer make decisions for yourself.

If you don’t have an advance directive, go to caringinfo.org or call 1-800-658-8898 where you can get free state-specific forms with instructions to help you make one.
 
‹ Previous Blog Entry
 

Your Opinions and Comments


Be the first to comment on this story!


You must be logged in to post a comment.




Not a subscriber?
Subscriber, but no password?
Forgot password?

Savvy Senior Archives


Resource Links savvy senior
Savvy Senior blog bio side
Heavenly Touch homeAllstate & McBride RealtyVoncille Bielefeld homeTriple R DC Expertsauto chooserDrama Kids

  Copyright © 2007-2015 Wilson County News. All rights reserved. Web development by Drewa Designs.