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Agriculture Today

Industry leaders address winter feeding, animal ID program

Industry leaders address winter feeding, animal ID program
W.V. “Bill” Hyman, executive director of the Independent Cattlemen’s Association of Texas (ICA), addresses cattlemen Oct. 23 on the upcoming state identification program, effective Jan. 1.

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Wilson County News
November 21, 2012
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FALLS CITY -- Cattlemen heard from speakers who addressed winter feeding and the upcoming state animal identification program during the Oct. 23 South Central Texas Independent Cattlemen’s Association chapter’s quarterly meeting in Falls City

Dusty Abney of Cargill Industries gave a refresher course on winter feed options. Abney’s program, “Winter Supplementation Strategies,” gave insight to last year’s most expensive cost for cattlemen -- hay. Ranchers who subject round bales to the elements, rather than storing them in a barn, can lose up to 30 percent of the bale for feeding. A hay barn can pay for itself within five years, Abney said.

Abney suggested that ranchers test the hay and forage to gauge the amount of protein to determine the type of supplemental feed needed to keep their animals in top condition for breeding and raising calves.

A number of cattlemen engaged in the discussion following Abney’s presentation. Abney reminded the cattlemen to manage their operations as they did during the drought, to remain profitable in the business.

ID program

Also, during the winter months, cattlemen will feel the effects of the Texas cattle traceability rule, which will take effect Jan. 1. The program cancels the brucellosis test requirement for adult cattle during a change of ownership. The program, overseen by the Texas Animal Health Commission, will help the health commission to trace animals in the event of a disease breakout.

W.V. “Bill” Hyman, executive director of the Independent Cattlemen’s Association of Texas (ICA), gave a brief overview of the proper identification allowed for the selling of sexually intact animals ages 18 months and older.

While the Texas Animal Health Commission is coordinating the distribution of 4 million U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) tags and 4,000 applicators, Hyman said the number of applicators is far short of the 100,000 ranches in the state. The cost of an applicator is approximately $18. Currently, veterinarians and sale barn operators have the supplies needed for implementation.

At the present time, it is uncertain what fee, if any, sale barn operators will charge if an animal has no tag and needs one for compliance. It is uncertain if a penalty will be imposed on owners who do not properly identify cattle when changing ownership.

Information provided by producers who register their farms and ranches for a premises number with the former National Animal Identification System (NAIS) program cannot be used in this revised program, Hyman said.

The ICA remains opposed to the tagging of adult cattle going to slaughter. The ICA supports the use of market back tags for these animals, which is allowed in the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s animal identification program.

Hyman suggests cattlemen contact the Texas Animal Health Commission Traceability Team for more information; call 1-800-550-8242, ext. 733, or visit www.tahc.state.tx.us.

Hyman and two other speakers also addressed estate taxes during this event. For more, see related article 2D.

For more information regarding the local ICA chapter, contact President Brad Cotton at 830-391-0337 or A.L. “Windy” Miller at 210-215-1139, or visit icatexas.com/.

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