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Found: 2 brindle cows, on Sept. 12, at the end of La Gura Rd. in South Bexar County, located between South Loop 1604 and the San Antonio River, Gillett Rd. on east and Schultz Rd. on the west. Call after 8 p.m., 210-310-9206.
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Henry Howard Services is accepting applications for QUALIFIED and EXPERIENCED vacuum, end dump and winch truck drivers. Applicants must have a class A CDL with tanker endorsement. Hazmat endorsement preferred but not required. Call 830-569-8144 for more information or pick up an application at 980 Humble Camp Rd, Pleasanton, Texas 78064. 
ON-CALL CRISIS POOL WORKERS NEEDED. Part-time positions are available for after hours “on-call” crisis workers to respond to mental health crisis for Wilson and Karnes Counties. Duties include crisis interventions, assessments, referrals to stabilization services, and referrals for involuntary treatment services according to the Texas Mental Health Laws. You must have at least a Bachelor’s Degree in psychology, sociology, social work, nursing, etc. On-call hours are from 5 p.m.-8 a.m. weekdays, weekends and holidays vary. If selected, you must attend required training and must be able to report to designated safe sites within 1 hour of request for assessment. Compensation is at a rate of $200 per week plus $100 per completed and submitted crisis assessment, and mileage. If interested call Camino Real Community Services, 210-357-0359.
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Agriculture Today

Drought, feed costs influence 2013 livestock markets

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February 13, 2013 | 4,338 views | Post a comment

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- Drought and high feed costs could continue to restrict livestock markets in 2013 if conditions do not improve, according to Dr. David Anderson, professor and economist in Livestock and Food Products Marketing with the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service. According to a Jan. 14 American Farm Bureau Federation press release, Anderson addressed livestock producers from across the country during an issues conference at the American Farm Bureau Federation’s 94th annual meeting.

“Underlying everything we talk about in terms of livestock markets, everything starts with where we are with drought and pasture conditions,” Anderson said. “Where we go in terms of costs, particularly, will be based on what happens with the drought in the coming year.”

Corn prices reached up to $8 per bushel last year due to the drought. Higher feed costs led to increased production costs for cattle, pork, and poultry farmers, resulting in increased retail prices to consumers. However, Anderson projects that as more acres of corn are planted in 2013, lower prices and decent yields may bring the market back into equilibrium, provided the drought subsides.

Anderson also noted that meat prices in 2013 largely will hinge on demand. Per capita consumption of all meat in the United States has declined in the past five years, reflecting higher retail prices and a weak domestic economy.

“The key for how high those market prices can go, how much those prices recover to pay for record-high feed costs we can get, is really going to hinge on what happens to demand for those meat products in the overall economy,” he said.

While per-capita consumption of beef, pork, and poultry are down, Americans still enjoy eating meat. Other factors like a growing population, increased exports, and decreased production have affected the per-capita measurement.

“As we see reports over the next couple of years about declining meat consumption, it doesn’t have anything to do with people not liking meat,” Anderson noted. “It’s that we’re producing less, and we have booming export markets.”

Export markets will continue to be a strong outlet for livestock producers in 2013. American farmers and ranchers stand at the ready to fill increased demand from around the world as the global economy improves and dietary preferences continue to shift to include more meat.

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