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Lost & Found

Lost: Calf, red and black tiger striped, white faced, Oak Hill Rd. off U.S. Hwy. 87, La Vernia. Call Carrol, 210-488-3071. 
Our beloved Gracie is missing since October, Dachshund/Lab mix, microchipped, about 30 pounds, black with little white. $1000 reward for safe return. Call with any information, 830-393-9999 or 419-250-9099.
$500 cash reward for the return or information that leads to the return of missing bull, registered polled Hereford with tattoo ID# Z203, distinctive marks on head, yellow tag in right ear, "D" brand on right hip, missing from Hwy. 119 and C.R. 454 intersection. Call Patrick Danysh, 210-827-9331.
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Help Wanted

The Floresville Independent School District is accepting applications for District Wide Custodian Positions, 2:00 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. shift. Applications may be obtained online at www.fisd.us or contact Sylvia Campa at 830-393-5300 ext. 14002 for appointments. FISD Personnel Office is located at 1200 5th St., Floresville, Texas. 830-393-5300 (Office hours: 8:00-4:00). Applications will be accepted until all positions are filled. An Equal Opportunity Employer.
Karnes/Wilson Juvenile Probation Department is seeking the following positions: Juvenile Probation Officer: Must be degreed in Criminal Justice or related field with experience working with children and parents. Position is year round supervising juvenile offenders, making recommendations to court, curfew checks, and being on call. Attendance/Juvenile Probation Officer: Must be degreed in Criminal Justice or related field with experience working with children and parents. The Attendance Officer works same hours as the school districts providing prevention services to children and parents who have issues with truancy. Juvenile Probation Officer will manage a small caseload of juvenile offenders making recommendations to court, curfew checks, and being on call. Position is year round.  Individual must be versatile and able to separate prevention from intervention skills. Prevention Specialist: Position acts as a drill instructor within the environment of the Juvenile Justice Alternative Education Program (JJAEP). Follows JJAEP school calendar. This is a quasi-military program, so prior military experience a plus. Degreed individual preferred with experience working with children. Must be a Juvenile Supervision Officer or be able to obtain the certification. Administrative Prevention Specialist: Position acts as a drill instructor but takes on administrative assistant role to the Assistant Chief within the Juvenile Justice Alternative Education Program (JJAEP). Position will include direct contact with the child and parent. Must be a Juvenile Supervision Officer or able to obtain. Prefer degreed individual. Must have knowledge of military procedures. To apply send resume to n-schmidt@kwjpd.com.
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Agriculture Today


State climatologist: global surface temperatures likely to set new record this year


State climatologist: global surface temperatures likely to set new record this year
In this 2010 NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory false-color image, the immense area of cold water brought to the surface by the La Niña shows as a blue and purple swath stretching from the eastern to the central Pacific Ocean. The 2010 La Niña was characterized as one of the most intense events of the past 50 years, according to climatologists. / NASS/JPL/Bill Patzert image


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Robert Burns
March 27, 2013
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COLLEGE STATION -- There’s very good evidence the same factors contributing to the drought -- the El Niño-La Niña cycle -- have temporarily stalled global warming, according to a Texas A&M University climatologist.

During the last two decades of the 20th century, climatologists recorded a rapid rise in average temperatures. But in the last decade the rise has leveled off, said Dr. John Nielsen-Gammon, Texas State Climatologist, College Station.

“Global temperatures have been relatively flat for the past several years, Nielsen-Gammon said. “Some people use that information to try to imply that global warming has stopped. But it turns out that the factors causing global warming are still there, it’s just that the El Niño-La Niña cycle has temporarily trended cooler and has partially masked the warming.”

Nielsen-Gammon compared a strong La Niña’s effect on atmospheric temperatures to that of leaving a refrigerator door open.

“In the tropical Pacific, there’s actually fairly cold water just below the surface,” he said. “With a La Niña event, that cold water is drawn all the way up to the surface, and interacts with the atmosphere and causes it to be cooler. If you leave the refrigerator door open, the room will be a little cooler.”

But this is a temporary effect rather than a long-term effect, as are the ever- increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases during the last 50 years, he said.

“If my forecast is correct, and there’s no La Niña to hide the underlying warming trend, global surface temperatures are likely to increase and set a new record this year.”

For the short term, the next four or five years, farmers and ranchers might hope global warming does pick back up this year, Nielsen-Gammon said.

“On the short term, the same oceanic factors that cause global temperatures to go up temporarily also tends to cause rainfall in the Southern United States to go up temporarily,” he said.

AgriLife Extension district reporters compiled the following summaries for March 11-18:

AgriLife Extension district reporters for the Southwest District, including Wilson, Gonzales, Guadalupe, and Bexar counties, reported recent rains and hail brought moisture to some parts of the Hill Country. Wheat was not looking good, and pasture conditions declined. Mesquite trees were budding out. Farmers were planting milo and were nearly finished planting corn. Livestock producers continued supplementing cattle with hay and protein.

AgriLife Extension district reporters for the Coastal Bend District, including Karnes County, reported drought conditions continued to get worse with no significant rainfall recorded. In Austin County, farmers had nearly wrapped up planting corn, rice, and sorghum. Cool-season grasses had not fully recovered from last year, but grazing was plentiful.

In Victoria County, a lack of rain and high winds were rapidly depleting topsoil moisture, undermining those crops already planted as well as permanent pastures and hay fields. In Refugio County, the weather remained dry, causing rangeland and pasture conditions to decline. Farmers were working overtime to plant corn, sorghum, and cotton, trying to take advantage of what soil moisture there was. 


Robert Burns has nearly 30 years’ experience writing about agriculture and agricultural-related research. He writes about Texas AgriLife Research and Texas AgriLife Extension Service activities at the Overton Center and centers in Stephenville and Temple.
 

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