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Agriculture Today


Local man’s Meyer lemon tree outgrows others


Local man’s Meyer lemon tree outgrows others
The Meyer lemons growing on the Mendoza tree in the Eagle Creek subdivision are weighing down branches. Frank N. Meyer identified this type of lemon in 1908.


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Wilson County News
April 10, 2013
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FLORESVILLE -- The Rio Grande Valley’s acres of citrus trees provide produce for consumers across the nation, but an Eagle Creek resident gathers an abundant crop from a single tree. Last year alone, his Meyer lemon tree produced 1,100 fruits and the tree is loaded again this year.

Jose Mendoza said that he purchased two Meyer lemon trees in 2000 -- one for himself and another for his father. At that time, they lived in the Calaveras area and the trees were in pots. After their home was flooded twice, Mendoza moved to the Eagle Creek subdivision in 2004.

After his father passed away, he decided to plant the two trees in the ground. Mother Nature at first was not kind to Mendoza and the trees had to grow back from a bad freeze.

Mendoza planted his father’s tree at the rear of his home and he thinks the location is perfect for production. He shares the harvest with his family and friends, and reserves some for his own use. The fruits range from the size of regular oranges to as large as grapefruits, he said.

Mendoza’s lemon trees are complemented by other fruit trees. He also has three types of apple trees, as well as peach, pomegranate, plum, and nectarine.

And what about Mendoza’s tree that he planted several feet away from his father’s tree? It is only 3 feet tall!
 

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