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Agriculture Today


Freeze may crop bounty for peaches




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Robert Burns
May 1, 2013 | 4,192 views | Post a comment

COLLEGE STATION -- What some have termed “crazy weather” appears to have cut potential peach yields by three-fourths or more in the major production areas of the state, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service horticulturist.

Unseasonably warm weather punctuated by late freezes in the Central Texas, North Texas, and Rolling Plains regions has knocked back the peach crop considerably, said Dr. Larry Stein, AgriLife Extension horticulturist in Uvalde who works mainly with pecans, fruits, grapes, and vegetable crops.

“We’ve definitely had some damage,” Stein said. “A lot of fruit has been lost, but there are still some peaches around.”

The damage varied by peach variety and growing sites, he said.

“At the best sites, (on higher ground) the cold air drained away, and in a lot of those instances there are a few peaches scattered around,” Stein said. “And it was also variety driven. Certain varieties -- Redglobe was one -- seemed to fare better than others.”

It’s hard to estimate the total damage as there are so many large and small producers growing different varieties on various kinds of sites, he said.

“We all hesitate to put that number out there, but I’d say the amount of crop we have (left) is about 20 to 25 percent.”

The good news is that the remaining crop should be of excellent quality -- large and of good flavor -- because of the thinning by the freeze, Stein said.

“And because we may be going into a droughty time, maybe having a short crop during a drought will be a silver lining as the trees won’t be as stressed.”

Of course, some peach-growing areas dodged the freeze, Stein noted. For instance, East Texas orchards were largely spared.

“It just depended upon where that cold air settled,” he said.

The High Plains and South Plains also received hard freezes, but there are few peaches grown in that area. There are some apple orchards there, but because apples do not bloom as early as peaches they should recover, he said.

Robert Burns has nearly 30 years’ experience writing about agriculture and agricultural-related research. He writes about Texas AgriLife Research and Texas AgriLife Extension Service activities at the Overton Center and centers in Stephenville and Temple.

Rhew Orchards
While the Texas peach crop may not be as abundant as in past years, Ann Rhew of Rhew Orchards in Floresville reported they “were not affected by the freeze. ... We have a full crop.”
At the present time, their “Texas First” cling peaches are available for purchase. These peaches are “newly patented by Texas A&M,” Rhew said.
Hours of operation are Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. until 6 p.m.; and Sunday, 1-5 p.m.
Rhew Orchards is located at 762 C.R. 403, 5 miles east of Floresville off S.H. 97 E.
For more information, call 830-393-6022 or visit http://rheworhards.com.
 

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