Tuesday, October 21, 2014
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

Lost & Found


VideoFound Puppy - long haired dachshund found on Old Corpus Christi Rd several weeks ago. I have posted his picture everywhere, to no avail. Please help! 210-355-1594 call or text!
Lost: Small black female dog, no collar, her name is Shortcake, has long hair, Sutherland Springs area. Call 830-391-5099.
If you are missing a pet in Floresville, be sure to check the Floresville holding facility. Animals are only kept for 3 days. Contact Las Lomas K-9 Rescue, 830-581-8041.
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

Provider position in Wilson/Atascosa County, temporary part-time, hourly depending on family needs which may include some evening and weekend hours. Provides services to consumer with intellectual and developmental disabilities living in their own home or family home. Assists them with hygiene, housekeeping, meal preparation, and other services as needed. Trains individuals to do these activities independently.  Provides transportation to medical appointments, outings and other community access activities. Transportation will include travel out of the area and to other cities as  requires. High school diploma or GED, or pass competency test administered by Camino Real and provide 3 letters of reference; valid Texas driver’s license and acceptable driving record. Apply at Camino Real CS, 1325 3rd Street Floresville, or contact Human Resources for application 210-357-0359. www.caminorealcs.org. EOE.
The 81st & 218th Judicial District Community Supervision and Corrections Department (Adult Probation) is currently seeking a qualified applicant for the position of Supervision Officer for ATASCOSA COUNTY. Requirements: A Bachelor’s degree recognized by the Texas Higher Education Coordination Board in Criminology, Corrections, Criminal Justice, Law Enforcement/Police Science, Counseling, Pre-Law, Social Work, Psychology, Sociology, Human Services Development, Public Administration, or a related field that has been approved by the Community Justice Assistance Division (CJAD), or one year of graduate study in one of the above mentioned fields, or one year experience in full-time casework, counseling, or community or group work that has been approved by CJAD.  This position requires some evening and/or weekend work. Salary: Negotiable, plus Regular State benefits. Closing Date: Resumes will be taken until November 4, 2014. Procedure: Applicants should submit a typed resume and copy of college transcript to: Mario Bazan, Director, 914 Main Street, Ste #120, Jourdanton, TX  78026 The 81st & 218th Judicial District Community Supervision and Corrections Department is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos





Video Vault ›

Keeping the Faith


Keeping the Faith: Just Hang On




E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story

Disclaimer:
Ronnie McBrayer is responsible for this content, which is not edited by the Wilson County News or wilsoncountynews.com.

May 7, 2013 | 1288 views | Post a comment

When I was a bit younger and a bit braver, a group of friends and I shot the rapids on the Ocoee River in southeast Tennessee. The Ocoee, which I think is the Cherokee word for “terrified rafter” is a world class whitewater adventure.

Now, I’m no world class athlete, and that became evident on the river. I so feared being sucked out of the boat that I literally dug my toenails into the rubber raft I was paddling. But by the time we finished, I was on a first name basis with rapids named Broken Nose, Table Saw, and Diamond Splitter -- and it was an incomparable thrill.

Whitewater sports began quite accidentally on this river. The Ocoee is dammed to produce electricity. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has operated their dams for years, and for the longest time, TVA’s production of electricity killed the river. Only a trickle of water, no more than ankle deep in places, flowed through the gorge.

But in the late 1970s a portion of one of their dams broke, sending the full force of the Ocoee through the canyon for the first time in decades. Whitewater outfitters and kayakers jumped all over the opportunity, setting up impromptu river tours. After the dam was repaired, legislators were wise enough to pass laws to protect the recreation that had developed on the river. So, for 112 days a year the Ocoee River is “turned on” for kayaking and rafting enthusiasts.

On the morning I arrived at the river there was nothing but rocks. “How are we going to shoot the rapids when I can rock-jump across the river and never get wet?” I asked my guide. Speaking like a cross between Jedi-Master Yoda and some drug-empowered oracle he said, “Sweat it not, dude. The water is coming.”

He was right. The water was coming. Thirty miles upstream the water had been released. It took a little while to get there, but as I watched, the babbling stream turned into a torrent of whitewater, and the adventure was afoot. The power of those rapids was incredible. I couldn’t dictate to the river with my little paddle and rubber dinghy any more than I could turn on or off the dam’s floodgates.

There was no control over the water; I had to go where it pushed me. Sure, at times I could steer, paddle or even stop, hiding behind a huge rock; but when released over the rapids all I could do was scream, flay at the water, and pray. The power of the water had been unleashed, and we were just along for the ride.

Living out the life of faith is a lot like that. We have our raft, paddle, and are in this boat with our friends on the same journey. What began as a dribble is now an unstoppable flood. We are paddling along best we can, moved by the unleashed Spirit of God.

And sometimes we are more than moved. Sometimes life and faith are not placid escapades of reflection and peace. Instead, the journey of faith becomes a bone-jarring exercise in survival, crashing over the rocks and through the rapids, threatening to drown us. We are often jostled from the security of our raft, forced to scream out of desperation for a rope or lifeline of rescue. We struggle and fight just to keep our noses above the water line.

We may get the relieved opportunity to list in quiet pools, catching our breath and resting our muscles from time to time. But then, the water will pick up and we are on our way again. Sure, there are things we can and should do along the way: Pray, hang on, watch out for our friends, and paddle like our hair is on fire. But ultimately we are riding the wave of God as he does his good will and purpose. His power has been turned on in our lives, and all we have to do is hang on and let it take us where it will.
 
« Previous Blog Entry (May 6, 2013)
 


Your Opinions and Comments
Be the first to comment on this story!

You must be logged in to post comments:



Other Keeping the Faith


Keeping the Faith bio sidebar
Keeping the Faith sidebar button

Triple R DC ExpertsSacred Heart SchoolVoncille Bielefeld homeHeavenly Touch homeBlue Moon Karaoke & DJAllstate & McBride RealtyDrama KidsWilson's Auto ChooserChester Wilson
  Copyright © 2007-2014 Wilson County News. All rights reserved. Web development by Drewa Designs.