Friday, September 4, 2015
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

WCN Site Search


Lost & Found


VideoStill missing: Long hair Chihuahua, near 3rd and Hwy. 97, Floresville, she is very missed. If you see her please call Jeri, 409-781-3191.

VideoFound: Male dog in Eagle Creek, with collar no tags, clean and healthy, very friendly, non aggressive. Call if he's yours, 210-844-1951. 

VideoLost: Shih Tzu, male, golden brown, from C.R. 320 in Floresville. If you have any information call 210-452-1829 or 832-292-3305.
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

ON-CALL CRISIS POOL WORKERS NEEDED. Part-time positions are available for after hours “on-call” crisis workers to respond to mental health crisis for Wilson and Karnes Counties. Duties include crisis interventions, assessments, referrals to stabilization services, and referrals for involuntary treatment services according to the Texas Mental Health Laws. You must have at least a Bachelor’s Degree in psychology, sociology, social work, nursing, etc. On-call hours are from 5 p.m.-8 a.m. weekdays, weekends and holidays vary. If selected, you must attend required training and must be able to report to designated safe sites within 1 hour of request for assessment. Compensation is at a rate of $200 per week plus $100 per completed and submitted crisis assessment, and mileage. If interested call Camino Real Community Services, 210-357-0359.
Mixer needed for local bakery, at least 2 years minimum experience. Apply in person at 1371 F.M. 1346, La Vernia, TX 78121.
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos





Video Vault ›
Richardson Chevrolet homeTNMCRE/MAX home
You’ve been granted free access to this subscribers only article.

Section A: General News


Editorial: Texas must educate more than elite to secure future




E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story
Guest Editorial
May 22, 2013 | 1,163 views | Post a comment

By Matthew Ladner, Ph.D.

Texas currently stands as an economic juggernaut, leading the nation in private sector job growth by a wide margin. Texans, however, suffer from an Achilles heel that remains largely unrecognized. In 2011, the Nation’s Report Card, a highly respected national examination, revealed that only 27 percent of Texas’ eighth-grade students score proficient in reading. The bitter experience of the 1980s taught that heavy reliance upon commodities eventually ends in tears. In order to truly secure the state’s future as an opportunity society, Texans must relentlessly pursue public school improvement.

The NAEP data reveal appalling achievement gaps: 42 percent of Texas Anglos read proficiently, while only 17 percent of Hispanics met the standard, with even lower average achievement for Black students. Hispanics now make up a majority of Texas public school students. The future prosperity and stability of the state rests upon providing opportunity for all students.

The Texas lawmakers are debating important issues regarding graduation standards during the 2013 session. Even more fundamental issues remain. We need to be asking what can be done to ensure that more Texas public school students can read the textbooks of whatever courses they take.

In addition to academic issues, Texas districts have been annually adding approximately 80,000 new students. The resulting financial strain has required a steadily decreasing percentage of funds going into the classroom.

Texas public school enrollment has grown by more than 50 percent since 1990, from approximately 3.3 million students in 1990 to 5 million today. Costs per students have surged and the percentage of funds available for instruction has declined. Since 2000 the total expenditure per child has increased from $6,638 per pupil to $11,146. Debt service and capital outlay costs nearly doubled as a percentage of district budgets.

Today less than half of funds go to pay for instruction as teachers find themselves squeezed in expanding district budgets and taxpayers feel the strain of annually rising property taxes. Texas in effect tried and failed to spend their way to higher quality schools.

Texans were K-12 reform leaders in the 1990s but today these efforts appear to be low-hanging fruit. Just keeping ahead of most other large states will require upgraded academic performance. Internationally, competitive scores will require still more improvement.

Moving the needle on school performance will not be easy, but it is possible. A recent Stanford University study found that Florida achieved the second to largest NAEP score gains despite having the smallest overall increase in per-student funding.

The Florida strategy relied upon clear transparency (A-F school grades based upon student proficiency and academic growth) and the most far-reaching parental choice policies in the nation. Florida lawmakers provided incentives for improvement and opportunities for parents to match their child with a school that meets their needs.

Even schools with high average performance have students who could prosper more elsewhere. The experience with parental choice clearly demonstrates that it improves both student learning and public schools. Florida’s low-income and minority students led the way on improvement, and the public education system grew stronger in the process.

Texas school districts have nothing to fear from parental choice. If every charter school west of the Mississippi River had opened in Texas, Texas school districts would have still expanded their enrollment by more than half a million students since 1990. The cartoonish elephant terrified of a mouse pose of various defenders of the status quo should not deceive anyone. Districts have more growth than they can handle.

Texas cannot remain a place where people live the American dream while educating only a fraction of students to levels sufficient to participate in the competitive global economy. Texans both urgently need and desire a public education system that helps every student reach their potential. Texans justifiably view their state as a land of opportunity.

We should stop at nothing to keep it so.

Matthew Ladner is a Senior Fellow with Texas Public Policy Foundation’s Center for Education Policy, a nonprofit, free-market research based institute in Austin.
 

Your Opinions and Comments


Be the first to comment on this story!


You must be logged in to post a comment.




Not a subscriber?
Subscriber, but no password?
Forgot password?

Section A: General News Archives


Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Brownlow: Little chance ‘fracking’ could hurt water (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. City’s proposed budget, property taxes raise questions (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. County Commisioners ‘buckle up’ on $24M budget (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Court Update (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. De Leon family sells Olivia’s San Antonio location (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Distracted driving program new requirement for teens (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Editorial: Coca-Cola to obese people: Hey, exercise more! (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Editorial: How will voters sort through all the candidates? (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Editorial: Libs: Symbols mean something — unless we disagree (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Floresville awards contract for event center repairs (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Floresville elections take twists (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Floresville struggles to ‘play ball’ (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Free webinar series for small businesses (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. From student job to interim manager (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Karnes airport gets $2.1M in funding (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Labor Day office closures (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Letter: Karnes County officials continue spending (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Letter: Urgent: Nix Iran deal (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Letter: Voter ID thumbprint (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Make your way to Feather Fest (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. MedDropSA is Sept. 5 (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Meeting Watch: East Central ISD (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Oscar Mayer issues recall (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Paid firefighters could aid La Vernia volunteers (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Police Blotter (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Register to compete in Adult Literacy challenge (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Relay committee to meet Sept. 8 (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. SARA approves study of Floresville’s River Park (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Sponsors needed for Conversation with Constitution event (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Stockdale council approves $2.07M 2015-16 budget (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Substitute teacher training dates set (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. TEA lauds Falls City, Poth (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. The best medicine (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. VA cuts backlog (September 2, 2015)
Full article available to Wilson County News subscribers only. Click here to subscribe. Welcome back! (September 2, 2015)