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Lost: Calf, red and black tiger striped, white faced, Oak Hill Rd. off U.S. Hwy. 87, La Vernia. Call Carrol, 210-488-3071. 
Lost: Cow, black with white face, female, west of La Vernia, near 2831 FM 1346, weighs about 1000 lbs., she is a fence jumper. Anyone with information call 830-534-4675.

VideoFound dog, cream white and black male w/ blue collar walking on hwy 181 by new richardson chevy last night call 2102863515
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Karnes/Wilson Juvenile Probation Department is seeking the following positions: Juvenile Probation Officer: Must be degreed in Criminal Justice or related field with experience working with children and parents. Position is year round supervising juvenile offenders, making recommendations to court, curfew checks, and being on call. Attendance/Juvenile Probation Officer: Must be degreed in Criminal Justice or related field with experience working with children and parents. The Attendance Officer works same hours as the school districts providing prevention services to children and parents who have issues with truancy. Juvenile Probation Officer will manage a small caseload of juvenile offenders making recommendations to court, curfew checks, and being on call. Position is year round.  Individual must be versatile and able to separate prevention from intervention skills. Prevention Specialist: Position acts as a drill instructor within the environment of the Juvenile Justice Alternative Education Program (JJAEP). Follows JJAEP school calendar. This is a quasi-military program, so prior military experience a plus. Degreed individual preferred with experience working with children. Must be a Juvenile Supervision Officer or be able to obtain the certification. Administrative Prevention Specialist: Position acts as a drill instructor but takes on administrative assistant role to the Assistant Chief within the Juvenile Justice Alternative Education Program (JJAEP). Position will include direct contact with the child and parent. Must be a Juvenile Supervision Officer or able to obtain. Prefer degreed individual. Must have knowledge of military procedures. To apply send resume to n-schmidt@kwjpd.com.
Sears is seeking a Delivery Driver/Sales Associate, must have great people and customer service skills and a willingness to work flexible hours; sales, delivery and installation of appliances, basic computer and register skills a plus, must pass background investigation, starting pay based on experience. If you are seriously interested in this position apply in person (no phone calls please) at the Sears Hometown store located at 2301 Tenth, Floresville.
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Agriculture Today


Horticulturist tells how to have a berry good farm


Horticulturist tells how to have a berry good farm
Blackberries can be a profitable business in Texas provided growers plant suitable varieties and manage the challenges of this crop.


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May 22, 2013
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By Kathleen Phillips

COLLEGE STATION -- Be they black or blue, berries can be a profitable business provided growers plant suitable varieties and manage the challenges of these crops, an expert with the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service said.

“Berries are a great crop in Texas,” said Monte Nesbitt, AgriLife Extension horticulture program specialist. “They can be grown for fun or for commercial purposes.”

Nesbitt addressed about 100 people at the Texas Fruit and Nut Orchard Conference in Bryan.

Blackberries, a type of bramble or caneberry, do well in Texas because they are improved varieties from wild dewberries that grow along roadsides in more southern areas of the state.

Nesbitt said several varieties have been developed for commercial plantings and are very productive with relatively little care.

“Blackberries come into full production within two years of planting,” he said. “They bloom later in the spring and have a long harvest season that may last into the fall.”

In addition to variety selection, growers should decide on planting location, considering that berries grow best in sandy soils and in U.S. Department of Agriculture Hardiness Zones 7, 8, or 9, Nesbitt said.

The horticulturist estimated that about 70 percent of the expenses associated with growing blackberries are for harvest labor. The berries must be picked when ripe since they do not continue to ripen after being plucked from the vine, so having available labor throughout the harvest season is essential.

“Blackberry farms provide a lot of opportunities,” he said. “But they are labor intensive, so sometimes it is more profitable to have ‘pick-your-own’ fields for consumers.”

He said blackberry plants can produce for more than 20 years and may yield up to 10,000 pounds per acre when well-managed. A pint basket may sell for $2.50 to $4.95 each.

Blueberry farms also can be profitable, Nesbitt added, yielding 15 pounds per plant or 9,000 pounds an acre.

The biggest challenge for this crop, however, is soil, he said.

“It must have the right soil, an acidic soil with 4.0-5.0 pH,” Nesbitt said. “And that can be a challenge.”

Rabbiteye blueberries, native to the Southeastern United States, grow best in East Texas, he said.

“Most rabbiteye blueberries need cross-pollination for good fruit set, so two varieties that bloom around the same time should be planted,” he added. “The harvest season can extend from late May to August, depending on the number of varieties planted.”

Nesbitt and AgriLife Extension horticulturists Jim Kamas of Fredericksburg and Dr. Larry Stein of Uvalde have produced a series of “how-to” publications aimed at helping potential growers learn how to produce more fruits and nuts in Texas. They can be found at

http://bit.ly/YuSrSV.

Kathleen Phillips is the news and media relation manager at Texas A&M AgriLife Extension communications.
 

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