Friday, October 31, 2014
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

Lost & Found

Lost: Diamond set in gold mounting prongs, fell off my wife's wedding ring, in Floresville, reward offered. 210-867-1319.

VideoFound: Long haired Dachshund puppy, on Old Corpus Christi Rd., several weeks ago, I have posted his picture everywhere, to no avail. Please help! 210-355-1594 call or text! 

VideoLost cat off cr 342 (lv city hall area) gray/white, long hair, sweet! Her people are extremely sad and worried! If you see Sassy, please call 8303914262 or 2103155041
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

We are looking for part-time energetic team members for growing gas station outside of La Vernia, duties to include cashier, food prep, stocking (must be able to lift 45 lbs), must be able to work days, nights, and weekends as schedule will vary. Contact Cynthia at 87ih@aiemail.net or apply in person at 87 Ice House, 6517 U.S. Highway 87, Sutherland Springs.
Maverick Grill is hiring waitstaff, kitchen manager, cashier, and line cook. Apply in person at 6671 U.S. Hwy. 181 N., Floresville, between 2-5 p.m. Monday-Saturday.
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos





Video Vault ›

Gardening Q&A


Ask the Master Gardeners: June 2013




E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story

Disclaimer:
Guadalupe County Master Gardeners is responsible for this content, which is not edited by the Wilson County News or wilsoncountynews.com.

June 1, 2013 | 1250 views | Post a comment

Q: I saw a red flowered perennial in a friend’s garden that had bees and butterflies around it. The friend called it bee balm. Will it grow well for me?

A: The answer is definitely yes. According to Wikipedia, monarda (bergamot, horsemint, bee balm) is a genus consisting of roughly 16 species of flowering plants in the family Lamiaceae. The one you saw is monarda didyma. The species include both annual and perennial upright growing herbaceous plants. The plants are used most frequently in areas in need of naturalization, and are often used in beds and borders to increase hummingbirds, pollinating insects, and predatory/parasitic insects that hunt garden pests. Wikipedia suggests that because of oils present in the roots, monarda plants are sometimes used as a companion plant around small vegetable crops susceptible to subterranean pests and can be a good plant to grow with tomatoes, supposedly improving both health and flavor. This last statement I will be able to confirm (or deny) after this year as I have a lovely Scarlet bee balm or monarda didyma planted right in the middle of one of my vegetable beds.

Wildflower.org describes Scarlet bee balm as a popular perennial with scarlet-red flowers in terminal tufts. The three foot stems are lined with large, oval, dark-green leaves. Individual flowers are narrowly tube-shaped, tightly clustered together in two inch heads. The leaves have a minty aroma. Hummingbirds are especially attracted to the red flowers.

Every spring a wild white beebalm comes up in my backyard that I suspect is M. citriodora or lemon bee balm. I also have another variety with pale purple flowers.

Q: What can I do to make my yard more friendly for birds?

A: The simplest answer is provide food, water, shelter and places for nests. Your trees or shrubs probably already have nests in them. I keep a couple of seed feeders filled year round, even though I have plenty of bushes with edible berries: hackberry, yaupon, American beautyberry, fig, blueberries (which I keep covered with a net for me), and chili peppers. Here in Texas we do need to provide water year round. I have a number of bird baths and two larger lily ponds. Refresh the water frequently to keep out mosquitoes. In my water lily ponds I use BT floats (which don’t hurt the fish) for mosquito larvae. Doug Welsh in his Texas Garden Almanac suggests that you also provide a small area of sand, tiny gravel, or crushed eggshells. This helps birds grind and digest seeds. Remember to also plant hummingbird plants. I already have hummers flying around my columbine, larkspur, salvias, Turks Cap and flame acanthus (anisacanthus quadrifidus). Lantanas, petunias, plumbago, verbena and four o’clock are also hummingbird plants.

Q: Is there a way to learn about drip irrigation?

A: Check with your County AgriLife Extension agent. He can provide information.

Clara Mae Marcotte is a Texas Master Gardener with Texas A&M AgriLife Extension. If you have a question to be answered, call the Master Gardeners at 830-379-1972 or leave a message to be answered. The website is guadalupecountymastergardeners.org. The Master Gardener research library is open Mondays from 8:30 to noon, on the second floor of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension building, 210 East Live Oak in Seguin.
 
« Previous Blog Entry (May 1, 2013)
 


Your Opinions and Comments
Be the first to comment on this story!

You must be logged in to post comments:



Other Gardening Q&A
Gardening-Blog
Sacred Heart SchoolWilson's Auto ChooserChester WilsonHeavenly Touch homeVoncille Bielefeld homeDrama KidsBlue Moon Karaoke & DJAllstate & McBride RealtyTriple R DC Experts

  Copyright © 2007-2014 Wilson County News. All rights reserved. Web development by Drewa Designs.