Wednesday, February 10, 2016
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Lost & Found

Lost: Female German Shepherd, about 2 years old, pink collar, lost from Hickory Hill/Great Oaks Subdivisions off FM 539, La Vernia, on Thurs., Feb. 4. Reward! 830-947-3465.
Found: Basset Hound, Hwy. 97 W./Hospital Blvd., Floresville. Call 830-391-2153 between 9 a.m.-11:30 p.m.
Bear, please come home! Missing since October 22, 2014, black Manx cat (no tail), shy. Reward! Help him find his way home. 210-635-7560.
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Help Wanted

Be skeptical of ads that say you can make lots of money working from the comfort of your home. If this were true, wouldn’t we all be working at home?
Immanuel Lutheran Church is now hiring for a Youth and Family Ministry Director. Pastoral: Minister to youth and their families during Sunday School and other church programs, being present in their lives outside the church walls, available for common concerns and in crisis situations. Leadership: Recruit and nurture Youth and Family Ministry program. Administration : Manage the planning process and coordinate with Pastor and Youth Committee all regular ministries to youth and their families. This includes youth of all ages on Sunday mornings and mid-week events; assisting with Confirmation, special events, trips and retreats, and parent meetings. Stewardship: Ongoing evaluation of the effectiveness of youth programs, manage youth ministry budget, and collaborate with the sponsors of each Youth group. Ability to build, lead, and empower youth. Ability to implement a ministry vision. Familiarity with Lutheran Doctrine required; must be comfortable teaching it and representing Lutheran Theology. Proficient computer skills using MS Word, Excel, PowerPoint, database, email, internet, and social media. Supervisory experience preferred. Ability to adapt and evaluate curriculum preferred. Must have excellent organization, communication (verbal and written), and listening skills, with a high degree of initiative and accountability. Exceptional interpersonal and relational skills required, with sensitivity to church members and visitors. Understanding and enjoyment of youth and families and guiding their spiritual development. Please send resumes to immanuellavernia@gmail.com or call 830-253-8121.
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Scam Central


A warning to consumers about 'clickjacking' scam




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Better Business Bureau
July 12, 2013 | 6,092 views | Post a comment

AUSTIN, Texas - Even savvy computer users can fall for "clickjacking," the latest trick that hides a scam on a seemingly safe web page. It’s a scheme that makes victims think they are clicking a harmless link, when they are really activating a scam.

Here’s how it works:

It starts like most online phishing scams. You receive an email, social media message or text that directs you to a website. Scammers may claim to be from a major store chain, and say they are giving away a gift. They instruct you to go to a website and enter to win.

When you arrive at the site, everything looks normal. But scammers have hidden links and other content on the page. In addition to the content you can see, scammers have added an invisible layer.

You complete a form to “register,” thinking your click will enter you for a “free gift” or other special offer, but you are really activating a code. This code can do anything from placing an order with an online retailer to changing the settings on your computer.

This technique is also used to trick you into "liking" something on social media that you normally wouldn't. This is called "likejacking." For example, you might receive an attention-getting message that you’re in a video. Just by clicking to see it, you might actually activate a code which “likes” the webpage and publicizes the link on your newsfeed.

Better Business Bureau has these tips for consumers to avoid a “clickjacking” or “likejacking” scam:

Click with caution. Stay away from teasers for sensational videos and messages that require you to “click here” in order to see the full video or message.

Update your computer. The newest versions of browsers have security updates that warn you of suspicious websites. Also, make sure you have antivirus software installed on your computer, and that it is up-to-date.

Log out of websites. Many “clickjacking” scams take advantage of web users' habit of staying logged into social media sites or popular online retailers. Make sure to always log out of any webpage you’re not using, and avoid selecting the tab “remember me” when signing in to a site. By staying logged on to multiple sites, it makes it that much easier for scammers to "like" or even purchase something in your name.

Don't fall for fake sites. It's easy to steal the colors, logos and headers of an established organization. Make sure to do your research to make sure that website is legitimate and not an imitation. Just because a site looks real, does not mean it is.
If you become a victim of internet fraud, USA.gov has a list of official government web resources to help direct you on the next steps to take.

To check the reliability of a company and find trustworthy businesses, visit bbb.org.
 

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