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Lost & Found


VideoPlease help my toy Aussie get home..181 & 1604 area. She's an adult,13" & less than 20 pounds. Please call if you see or find her. 210-328-5050
Our beloved Gracie is missing since October, Dachshund/Lab mix, microchipped, about 30 pounds, black with little white. $1000 reward for safe return. Call with any information, 830-393-9999 or 419-250-9099.

VideoFound dog, cream white and black male w/ blue collar walking on hwy 181 by new richardson chevy last night call 2102863515
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Help Wanted

Billing and Shipping Rep. needed for local manufacturer in Elmendorf. Responsibilities: customer service, sales order entry, bills of lading, Internet sales and shipping, filing, and answering phones. Requirements: high school diploma or GED, packaging and shipping knowledge preferred with DOT and HAZMAT. Excellent benefits offered. Apply in person at 7124 Richter Road, Elmendorf, TX or fax resume to 210-635-7999.
*Fair Housing notice. All help wanted advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference limitation or discrimination." This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for help wanted ads, which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
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Scam Central


A warning to consumers about 'clickjacking' scam




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Better Business Bureau
July 12, 2013 | 5,716 views | Post a comment

AUSTIN, Texas - Even savvy computer users can fall for "clickjacking," the latest trick that hides a scam on a seemingly safe web page. It’s a scheme that makes victims think they are clicking a harmless link, when they are really activating a scam.

Here’s how it works:

It starts like most online phishing scams. You receive an email, social media message or text that directs you to a website. Scammers may claim to be from a major store chain, and say they are giving away a gift. They instruct you to go to a website and enter to win.

When you arrive at the site, everything looks normal. But scammers have hidden links and other content on the page. In addition to the content you can see, scammers have added an invisible layer.

You complete a form to “register,” thinking your click will enter you for a “free gift” or other special offer, but you are really activating a code. This code can do anything from placing an order with an online retailer to changing the settings on your computer.

This technique is also used to trick you into "liking" something on social media that you normally wouldn't. This is called "likejacking." For example, you might receive an attention-getting message that you’re in a video. Just by clicking to see it, you might actually activate a code which “likes” the webpage and publicizes the link on your newsfeed.

Better Business Bureau has these tips for consumers to avoid a “clickjacking” or “likejacking” scam:

Click with caution. Stay away from teasers for sensational videos and messages that require you to “click here” in order to see the full video or message.

Update your computer. The newest versions of browsers have security updates that warn you of suspicious websites. Also, make sure you have antivirus software installed on your computer, and that it is up-to-date.

Log out of websites. Many “clickjacking” scams take advantage of web users' habit of staying logged into social media sites or popular online retailers. Make sure to always log out of any webpage you’re not using, and avoid selecting the tab “remember me” when signing in to a site. By staying logged on to multiple sites, it makes it that much easier for scammers to "like" or even purchase something in your name.

Don't fall for fake sites. It's easy to steal the colors, logos and headers of an established organization. Make sure to do your research to make sure that website is legitimate and not an imitation. Just because a site looks real, does not mean it is.
If you become a victim of internet fraud, USA.gov has a list of official government web resources to help direct you on the next steps to take.

To check the reliability of a company and find trustworthy businesses, visit bbb.org.
 

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