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Lost: Female German Shepherd, 2 years old, pink collar. Lost from Hickory Hill/Great Oaks area off FM539, La Vernia on Thurs. Feb. 4 Reward! (830) 947-3465
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The 411: Youth


Parents, teachers key to success for ADHD students




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August 21, 2013 | 1,776 views | Post a comment

HOUSTON -- Finding ways to help a child with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, or ADHD, succeed in school can be challenging for parents.

Many parents choose not to inform teachers of their child’s disorder for fear of negatively labeling the student, but this could actually hinder the treatment process, said Dr. Diane Treadwell-Deering, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Baylor College of Medicine.

A better strategy involves combining the efforts of the parents, teachers, and students. They can work together by making a few classroom modifications:

•Sit the child at the front of the classroom, where distractions are less likely.

•Implement a system to help the student copy homework assignments accurately and gather appropriate materials.

•Schedule frequent breaks for the child throughout the day.

•Divide work into smaller chunks so the child is not performing one task for long.

As the child grows older, the demand for organization in school increases, but parents must resist the urge to “baby” the teenager.

Rather, it is important that the child learns to compensate for the disorder as they grow older, said Treadwell-Deering.
 

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