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Found: Pony. Call to describe, 830-391-0074.
Found: 2 brindle cows, on Sept. 12, at the end of La Gura Rd. in South Bexar County, located between South Loop 1604 and the San Antonio River, Gillett Rd. on east and Schultz Rd. on the west. Call after 8 p.m., 210-310-9206.
Lost: Border Collie, black and light brown, 9 months old, wearing a green collar, last seen Sept. 22 near CR 427 in Poth. If found call 210-324-1208.
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*Fair Housing notice. All help wanted advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference limitation or discrimination." This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for help wanted ads, which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
Office help needed: Must be organized, knowledgeable with Microsoft and Quickbooks, must pass background and drug test prior to employment. Apply by email or apply in person at 952 FM 99 Whitsett, TX 78075.
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South Texas Living

Tips on managing food allergies

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September 4, 2013 | 2,477 views | Post a comment

HOUSTON -- Food packages often come with the caution, “Warning: may contain peanuts,” and for good reason. It’s estimated that more than 1 million Americans suffer from peanut allergies and their reaction if exposed can be life-threatening.

Other common food allergies are to cow’s milk, tree nuts, fish and shellfish, egg, and even some fruits and veggies, said Dr. Celine Hanson, professor of pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and chief of the allergy/immunology clinic at Texas Children’s Hospital.

Symptoms of food allergies can range from mild to severe and can affect various parts of the body, including the digestive system, the respiratory system, and the skin.

Hanson offers several ways that patients can manage their food allergies.

The best tactic is to avoid foods that cause allergies altogether, Hanson said. But in addition, medications such as antihistamines and corticosteroids are available to help manage symptoms. Patients who suffer severe reactions should keep a device such as an EpiPen on hand so that they can administer an epinephrine shot.

Allergy sufferers should wear a medical bracelet or necklace with information about their allergy, and schools, caregivers, and even the parents of children’s friends should be notified of food allergies.

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